Kayhi completes 2nd week at 50%

Jocelyn Cannon/Staff writer

Kayhi staff and students finished their second week of the fifty percent capacity schedule. Students attended school two days a week according to the letter of their last names. The schedule is expected to continue until thanksgiving break. Kayhi principal Jason House said even though this schedule is a big adjustment it’s going well with everything considered.

“Overall I think it’s working great but it’s clearly a huge adjustment for staff and for students,” said House. “Clearly we would much rather have all the students here every day but we do think this was a really important adjustment to make considering the increased risk level within the community.” 

This situation is clearly best for the students health but adjusting to a new schedule is hard for some students, especially because it isn’t long term and it keeps changing. 

Kayhi junior Shelbi Johansen said she misses seeing her friends at school and it’s harder for her to stay focused during the off days.

“A lot of my friends are in the other group so I don’t get to see them all week. With less people to talk to or people to sit by I can’t just ask one of them for help either,” said Johansen. “On the off days it’s harder to stay on task if I’m at home with nobody to keep me focused. It has also been harder to wake up and be on time on the days that I have school because I’m used to the other 5 days of sleeping in.” 
    During these confusing times teachers are working as best they can to listen to students questions while also following guidelines and protocols. Kayhi science teacher Julie Landwher said she understands that it is stressful for students and wants to make sure she can make the learning as smooth as possible.

“I have ongoing concerns that students feel like their needs are being met and their voices heard in all of this – it seems stressful for them. We need to push forward with the learning but we also need to be responsive to what students need at this time. My hope is that we can get a rhythm that sticks, while still being prepared if things change again,” said Landwher. “It is a challenge to rearrange the lessons, classroom, and flow of things but one I am willing to face with a good attitude so that I can minimize as much stress for my students as possible.” For now we are scheduled to stay on the fifty percent model until after thanksgiving break but it is subject to change depending on community risk level.

NHS Induction Ceremony

Tessa Salazar/Staff writer

Kayhi’s National Honors Society is having a virtual induction ceremony on Nov. 17. In past years NHS has had the members and their families come to the ceremony. This year they have combined virtual and in person to make the ceremony covid friendly. They made it in person by having the members still get together for the ceremony while their loved ones watch from home. While the members are able to be present, they still have to wear masks and social distance. 

Link: https://youtu.be/1vnPDMOGjfA

Inductees: Hannah Moody, Julia Spigai, Jenna Walker, Kaydence Dyson, Lauren Olson, Spring McCarthy, Jesse Loughman, Jodee Paule, Sandra Johnston, Robert Cope-Powell, Sarah Short, Nicole West, Hayley Gilson, Chloe Gosnell, Charlie King, Joshua Gentry, Sam Jackson, Tessa Salazar, Riley Deal, Lauren Scarzella, and John Bernardo

Staff picks: Canvas and Zoom are…

Max Malouf 11

Canvas is a great learning tool and if used correctly not much can go wrong. It might not work for every class but for the most part assigning stuff to students to find and complete is pretty easy and simple on Canvas. Zoom on the other hand, is not. It seems as though Zoom is the best online alternative found yet, but there are still so many issues while using it. For some kids sitting down and following along with the teacher on Zoom is easy and productive to their learning experience, but it tends to allow the majority of students to be on their phone and fake pay attention.

Noelani Tillson 12

For my senior year of high school, obviously Zoom and Canvas aren’t my first choice. I’d rather be in person, seeing my friends and teachers. But none of us can control what’s happening and we all want to be safe. I think the Ketchikan school district is handling this situation to the best of their ability. The work does get difficult, not being in person and having the motivation to do the work while I lay in my bed staying safe at home is even more difficult. It seems that teachers are assigning more work for us to do while at home. I don’t know about anyone else but I do house work when I’m at home. So I don’t have tons of time to sit and finish a 150 pt. assignment in 2 days. I know this is a learning curve for us all but it would be nice to share our voice.

Nena Jones 12

Going into my senior year I thought that things would be normal like in the past. But this year it seems like summer where I never left technology. Everything has moved to Zooms and Canvas. For the most part, I do not like them. Canvas is confusing and I can’t find some of my assignments. Zoom is hard because there’s more distractions versus at school. We want to stay safe and we are controlling what we can over what we can’t. I know that everything that is being done within our school and community is the best they can do.

Charlie King 12

Although I would much rather be in school, Zoom is better than nothing. I think that there are many pros and cons to being on Zoom. On zoom there is less community, when a teacher calls on you feel very singled out, and it is extremely hard when there are technical difficulties. While I am not a fan of zoom I do think it’s the best way to keep connected during these crazy times.

Degan Linne 11

Zoom and Canvas are only good if used correctly. Back in March when we did zoom without assignments nobody did anything and soon no one even showed up. I think if there were graded assignments kids would start trying and would stop being on their phones. Canvas on the other hand is a different ball game then normal class work. I personally like Canvas in moderation but when teachers use it everyday then it starts to get boring and soon kids will either cheat on it or just not do it at all.

News: Recreational Center Update

Photo taken by Noel Tillson

Noel Tillson/ Staff writer

The Ketchikan Gateway Borough Recreation Center has moved to “Level 3 High Risk” when the city as a whole moved up a level. When in level three for the Rec Center employees must wear a face covering, this includes the life guards who can take off their face coverings when on the pool deck. Employees must stay in their “own pods” or perspective areas they work in. Employee Charlie King says it’s strange not seeing as many people in the building.

“I just started working there, but it’s still weird to not be busy to really only be checking people in or cleaning. Before there were sports and activities to watch but the building is so empty. We can’t even let people run into the building and use vending machines or bathrooms.”

Cleaning for employees is more critical than ever.  However temperature checks when coming into the building for employees and patrons are not back. Limits have been lowered for the amount of customers per room. 

The Rec Center helps the continuation of being active during the pandemic as well as a coping mechanism for all of the stress and chaos. For Garrett Mulder, he said going to the Rec Center during the pandemic hasn’t felt any different besides the limitations.

“Going to the Rec during level 3 has been a lot more difficult to get into the rooms I want to be in due to room limits,” said Mulder. “It’s a bummer that the sauna and other rooms are closed because we’re in a higher level. I’m just glad the weight room is still open.” 

Rooms that are open with limits:

Cardio room – 5 people

Weight room – 5 people

Track – 4 people

Lap swim – 1 person per lane

Childrens room – 4 people

Rooms/Activities that are closed:

Sauna 

Locker rooms 

Both gyms

All racquetball courts

All rentals

All classes and programs

All recreational swims (open swim and dollar swim)

News; math tutoring center

Shelbi Johansen/Staff writer

As most people know math can be very frustrating and kayhi teachers want to help. The after school math tutor center is open monday through thursday from 3:00pm – 4:00pm. The math tutor center is a place to work on homework and get help if you need it. Each teacher will host the tutor center in their room depending on the day. Monday – Mr.Fama, Tuesday – Mr.Raber, Wednesday – Mrs.Whyte, and Thursday – Mrs.Karlik. 

Math teacher Mrs. Jennifer Karlik said usually about 4-15 students come but it depends on if there is a test the next day. She said she has noticed an overall improvement in grades with the students who go regularly and better test scores. 

    ¨What makes the biggest difference is whether or not there are tests the next day,¨ Karlik said. ¨Better test grades and better grades in general, It’s a great place to work on homework and study for tests.¨ 

Karlik said the best part of having a tutor center is that it alleviates frustration and she loves to see students working together.

¨Math can be frustrating when you are all by yourself and you don’t have anyone to help you work with you,” said Karlik. ¨At the math tutor center, you not only have a math teacher to help you, but you also have other students. 

Math teacher Mrs. Terri Whyte said the amount of people who show up varies depending on what is happening.

¨There are afternoons when other math teachers besides the one assigned to work the tutor center go and help when it’s so busy. ¨Whyte said. Whyte said there are more people on certain days than others. 

¨ Some students come nearly every time just to get work done, most students show up the afternoon before a test.¨ Whyte said. ¨I wish students would be more scheduled and come get help BEFORE they are worried about the test the next day.¨ Whyte said she also noticed students who get homework help and study before a test do better in math classes. 

Senior Terik Brown said he went to the math tutor center everytime Mr.Fama was hosting it. 

¨I went everytime Fama was doing it because he was my teacher and I would understand more when he was teaching it.¨ Brown said. Brown said it helps him to focus on getting his math done.

¨That’s the subject I really struggle in so I really needed help with that and he helped me with that.¨ said Brown. Brown said that the tutor center helped him to focus and get his work done.

¨I couldn’t focus when it came to math because I never wanted to do it because I wasn’t good at it and I didn’t like it and my mom urged me to go,¨ Brown said. ¨So I finally went and it helped a lot.¨ Brown said that after attending the tutor center his test scores improved significantly as well. Brown said one of the most beneficial parts of having a math tutor center is having a teacher to help and a lot of time. 

¨ It was always welcome no matter who your teacher is and it would be for like and hour so it gives you a lot of time to finish homework.¨ Brown said.

News; math tutoring center

Shelbi Johansen/Staff writer

As most people know math can be very frustrating and kayhi teachers want to help. The after school math tutor center is open monday through thursday from 3:00pm – 4:00pm. The math tutor center is a place to work on homework and get help if you need it. Each teacher will host the tutor center in their room depending on the day. Monday – Mr.Fama, Tuesday – Mr.Raber, Wednesday – Mrs.Whyte, and Thursday – Mrs.Karlik. 

Math teacher Mrs. Jennifer Karlik said usually about 4-15 students come but it depends on if there is a test the next day. She said she has noticed an overall improvement in grades with the students who go regularly and better test scores. 

    ¨What makes the biggest difference is whether or not there are tests the next day,¨ Karlik said. ¨Better test grades and better grades in general, It’s a great place to work on homework and study for tests.¨ 

Karlik said the best part of having a tutor center is that it alleviates frustration and she loves to see students working together.

¨Math can be frustrating when you are all by yourself and you don’t have anyone to help you work with you,” said Karlik. ¨At the math tutor center, you not only have a math teacher to help you, but you also have other students. 

Math teacher Mrs. Terri Whyte said the amount of people who show up varies depending on what is happening.

¨There are afternoons when other math teachers besides the one assigned to work the tutor center go and help when it’s so busy. ¨Whyte said. Whyte said there are more people on certain days than others. 

¨ Some students come nearly every time just to get work done, most students show up the afternoon before a test.¨ Whyte said. ¨I wish students would be more scheduled and come get help BEFORE they are worried about the test the next day.¨ Whyte said she also noticed students who get homework help and study before a test do better in math classes. 

Senior Terik Brown said he went to the math tutor center everytime Mr.Fama was hosting it. 

¨I went everytime Fama was doing it because he was my teacher and I would understand more when he was teaching it.¨ Brown said. Brown said it helps him to focus on getting his math done.

¨That’s the subject I really struggle in so I really needed help with that and he helped me with that.¨ said Brown. Brown said that the tutor center helped him to focus and get his work done.

¨I couldn’t focus when it came to math because I never wanted to do it because I wasn’t good at it and I didn’t like it and my mom urged me to go,¨ Brown said. ¨So I finally went and it helped a lot.¨ Brown said that after attending the tutor center his test scores improved significantly as well. Brown said one of the most beneficial parts of having a math tutor center is having a teacher to help and a lot of time. 

¨ It was always welcome no matter who your teacher is and it would be for like and hour so it gives you a lot of time to finish homework.¨ Brown said.

The Kayhi Bands New Personal Protection Equipment

Tristan Dahl/Staff writer

The Kayhi Band resumed rehearsals with the start of the school year. Like all other Kayhi activities, students are required to follow covid guidelines. However that brings extra challenges regarding a class largely centered around wind instruments. 

Kayhi Band Director Bradley Crowe is basing all of the covid precautions in his classroom off of the schools guidelines, studies he is familiar with, and what other orchestras and national music groups across the country are doing.

    In the beginning of the year the band began by using surgical masks with slits cut in them and brass players emptied their spit onto puppy pads. Crowe also had more personal protective equipment ordered, or PPE for short, but the band didn’t receive them until this week. 

The new PPE is different depending on the instrument. Brass instruments such as trumpets, trombones, and french horns use bell covers that cover the end of the instrument. 

Crowe said that the bell covers somewhat alter the brass sections tone.

“As we have tested them we noticed they slightly mute the instruments, but the overall effect isn’t too detrimental to our sound,” Crowe said.

Senior trombone player Judy Meiresonne said it somewhat hurts her sound quality.

“It’s a hindrance because it stops my trombone’s reverberation, it’s more dampened,” Meiresonne said, “It’s sorta like a mask for my instrument.”

The new PPE for woodwinds is a large nylon bag that the instruments slip inside of, alongside the previously mentioned edited surgical masks. 

Senior Saxophone player Henry Clark said the PPE affects his instruments tuning. 

“When the instruments are in the bags they get really sharp,” Clark said, “Like 35 cents sharp.”

Crowe said the equipment is causing his woodwind players minor inconveniences.

 “With the woodwinds, the nylon bags that they put over their instruments are really just more of a nuisance than anything,” said Crowe, “The flutes probably have it the worst, their instruments are parallel with the ground and the bags that they have fall down on their fingers as they’re playing, and not only that, they have their own special face masks which are made specifically for flute players. Navigating those has been a significant challenge.” 

In addition to the safety precautions in class the band no longer meets all together, they meet as three separate ensambles of brass, wind, and percussion. They then combine for the final performance. 

Crowe said he misses the big band set up, but there are some advantages to the smaller class sizes.

“It is working out very nicely, all three instrument families have time to work on their craft and do work related to their specific instrument,” said Crowe, “Overall we are able to get more work done in a shorter amount of time.”

Crowe also said that the band adjusted surprisingly well to this years challenges.

“There were a lot of changes at the beginning of the year, a new director, covid, and a new class set-up,” said Crowe, ”I couldn’t have asked for a better transition into this year, the students have done an amazing job.”

    Clark said he thinks the band is already getting used to everything.

“I think that when we get to the first concert it (the PPE) will be a little more natural for us, but I don’t think it will ever feel normal because that’s not how any of us were taught to play our instruments,” said Clark.

    In addition to the in class precautions, the band has committed to the first performance being completely virtual. A Youtube Live link will be made available to all family and friends on the day of the performance. 

    Initially the band had considered different ways to hold the event in person. Clark advocated for an in person performance.

    “If we can socially distance while we play, then I definitely think we should do it in person,” said Clark.

    Meiresonne said she would prefer an online concert. 

    “Im just thinking of older parents,” she said, “We don’t want anyone to not come out of fear.”

The final decision came down to including everyone. Crowe and the students didn’t want any loved ones to miss the performance.

The Kayhi fall concert can be viewed live on youtube at 6:00

Election day recap

Henry Clark and Tristan Dahl/ Staff writers

A few minutes after noon the day after election day for the 2020 Presidential election.

Tristan: Last night Trump came in as an underdog in the polls. I’m really surprised how wrong those predictions were.

Henry: Came in as an underdog where? The polls have been incredibly wrong throughout this whole election and a lot of states that were expected to be blue weren’t and the same with red.

Tristan: That’s true, however Trump still had less pathways to victory compared to Biden. Trump had to win Florida, Pennsylvania and Ohio to even have a chance. Biden had a shot to flip Texas, that makes Trump an underdog.

Henry: Yeah I agree. Trump certainly flipped states or is close to flipping states that I thought would never get close to flipping. But then there’s Michigan and that has been the biggest surprise for me with states flipping and becoming blue.

Tristan: I agree that it was a surprise, I think it was most surprising to see how quickly the Democrats were able to gain back ground the day after the election, Trump led by a great margin last night and is now down.

Henry: Yes and the theory behind that is that Trump is against mailed in voting and absentee voters and so most of his supports came into the voting booths yesterday and voted for him, whereas Biden supporters are most of the mailed in and absentee voters so his votes came in last night when they started counting up the other votes rather than just the in person ballots.

Tristan: That’s one theory. The Trump campaign just filed a lawsuit to temporarily stop vote counting in Michigan, as well as Pensilvania. I think that definitely suggests foul play if the campaign is willing to invest into a lawsuit.

Henry: I did hear about it and that’s why Michigan was such a shock to me and while I don’t have an opinion on that lawsuit, I do agree that it was a complete surprise and that there is the possibility that there have been foul play.

Tristan: I agree. I think my second largest surprise of the night was Pennsylvania. Trump won the state narrowly in 2016 and the democrats invested heavily into swinging it back. It’s impressive that Trump is currently ahead.

Henry: I would be very surprised if Pennsylvania swayed to blue after Biden’s speech on stopping fracking greatly reduced his chance of winning that state and unless the voters in Pennsylvania forgot about that I wouldn’t bet on him winning that state. 

Tristan: I agree that Biden’s speech definitely hurt his support there, and this race takes all factors into account. 

Henry: That’s true but in a race like this every state counts when electoral difference is only two votes right now. Which candidate do you think is going to win? 

Tristan: Right now, I think Biden will win. He is 22 votes away and will win if he manages to carry Nevada and Michigan, both are very likely. 

Henry: I agree, but after hearing about the lawsuit in Michigan I am questioning the legitimacy of the votes. I think that if Michigan does end up voting red that Trump will win. While that’s true with many states, Trump’s leads seem to be much greater than Biden’s for the most part, but Biden’s leads are a lot closer and Michigan is an extremely weak link in Biden’s chain to presidency. 

Tristan: All the evidence currently suggests that this is still anyone’s race. Both major candidates still have clear paths to victory.

Henry: I mean this is the first presidential race I’ve ever studied closely so it’s all really exciting to get to see and I definitely think that at this point in time it’s really up in the air on who will win the presidency.

The Division

Henry Clark/Staff writer

I thought my senior year would be about picking my college and maturing into an adult. It turns out, senior year is about picking a political side and that the screaming tantrums never end.

I thought people matured and stopped whining after they became adults but if anything all they do is find “more important” things to moan about. With the political escapade rising, it never seems to hit the climax and cool down. I spend my time dazzling around politics trying to orientate myself in a world where my role models can’t seem to stop spinning to even explain to us youth what’s happening, and worse than that, showing us that it’s ok to act like complete hooligans as an adult when things don’t work out.

The youth will always have celebrities and people they look up to, both in politics and in society. But as these politicians and even celebrities become more and more extreme and divided  I feel forced to choose sides because typically our parents already have, and our teachers already have and our friends already have. Whether we want to or not we feel the need to pick sides because our parents, our friends and our role models have created this hure crevice in political ideologies. 

As role models, the adults in our society need to start acting like ones. Across the nation we see unprecedented conniption fits by not only the politicians but by the adults as well due to this political divide. I read the news and am appalled to see thirty-year old men and women acting like children because their candidate lost. It astounds me to see that it is acceptable to continue acting like toddlers even after I graduate high school.

Especially now as we head into another corrosive, controversial presidential election, I and many other students across the nation need not only clearity one what is happening but a united front from our role models on what is expected of us on how to behave and act. We need to be shown from our parents, celebrities and politicians on how to be a good loser, and a good winner. We as the youth need to see our role models act like rational adults in the face of making nationally controversial decisions and how we should act as we become adults as well. Because political divide or not, adults need to demand us to mature and to do so by example.

Pep club supports volleyball

Jocelyn Cannon

Staff writer

Kayhi Pep club is making posters Thursday after school to support Kayhi Volleyball in their game against Sitka this weekend for regions. This will be the first time that Pep club is officially coming together to support a team this school year. Pep club president Max Malouf said they’ve had some difficulties getting everything together but they’re really glad that the Pep club season is getting started.

“It’s been tough trying to organize everything but now that we’ve actually got everything we’re just really excited to finally be involved in some kayhi activities and get the year rolling for Pep Club, go Kings!” 

Malouf said that there is a 30 person limit for the Pep Club this year and that’s how they will decide the point system.

News from Ketchikan High School