The ins-and-outs of Halloween

Verona Kamberi & Farren Linne
Staff Writers

Part-time movie stars and superheroes fill the dark night searching for Tootsie Rolls, Pixi Sticks and Reese’s Peanut Butter Cups checking homes for the tastiest ways to destroy their pancreas. Carving funny faces into large orange spherical fruits and watching horror movies are all part of the spook-filled night.
Costumes
Finding the perfect costume isn’t easy. People spend a lot of time online and in stores trying to find the most unique and eye catching costumes. Senior Ingrid Anzueto believes that using your own interests to create your costume shows the people around you who you really are.
“People have advocates toward something so they express that on Halloween,” said Anzueto. “For example, people who love Trump might dress up as him this year.”
Nowadays shock value has replaced scare value when it comes to costumes. It’s about being edgy and even inappropriate. Organizations around the country implore people to not dress as Indians, transgenders, or anything offensive. People value attention and many would do almost anything to get it. Some think dressing up as Ray Rice and his spouse is funny, while most see it as rude and unacceptable. Retweets and shares of these costumes make it seem that this is acceptable behavior, when it’s not.
“Recently costumes have become more offensive both religiously and racially,” said junior Victoria Adams. “Social media makes it seem like it’s okay to have inappropriate costumes.”
The Real Halloween
For some people Halloween is more than just candy and costumes. The most significant part of Halloween for Adams is remembering her late family members.
“I spend my Halloween night celebrating the Day of the Dead with my family,” said Adams. “My family comes together to honor our ancestors and warn off the dead.”
The Day of the Dead, (also known as Dia de Muertos), is a three day Mexican holiday that involves praying and remembering friends and family members who have passed away in order to help support their spiritual journey.
Trick-or-Treating
Whether one celebrates the Day of the Dead or Halloween, both include a variety of food. For many trick-or-treating and collecting an abundance of candy is a necessity on Halloween, but not for senior Rizza Rodriguez.
“I don’t trick or treat on Halloween,” said Rodriguez. “I think that when you get to the point where you have money to buy your own candy you should stop and allow children to have the candy.”
Creating a good experience for younger children should be important. Even if you are 16 dressed as Batman wanting to go trick-or-treating, don’t let your peers stop you. Instead have a limit for yourself and make sure not to ruin it for the kids.
Safety
Although Halloween revolves around dressing up and having fun, safety is something everyone should be alert about. Junior Sydney Nichols feels like people have taken advantage of Halloween by creating an unsafe environment for kids.
“I feel that Halloween used to be more safe when I was younger,” said Nichols. “Now people dress up as clowns and hand out tampered candy.”
Staying safe by keeping an eye out for kids, trick-or-treating in a safe neighborhood, and monitoring the condition of candy should be an important part of everyone’s night. At the end of the night, going to bed knowing you had a successful Halloween will keep you waiting for next year.
“Even if trick-or-treating, pumpkin carving, or dressing up isn’t your thing, everyone should still find a way to enjoy the holiday,” said junior Grant Collins.

 

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