Category Archives: Culture

Still time to enroll on EF trip in summer of 2020

Leah Call
Staff Writer

There is still time to enroll to go with Mrs. Machado and Mrs. Woodward for the 2020 EF summer trip to Spain, Portugal, and France. Enrollment will close in February of 2020.

Kayhi teacher and chaperone, Allegra Machado has been taking students all over the world since 2005. Through the program she has been able to accompany groups to European countries such as Greece, Barcelona, Paris, and Madrid. 

“It is truly a once in a lifetime experience. These trips are amazing learning opportunities.” Machado said.

Students across all grade-levels are encouraged to go. As long as the student is in good academic standing and isn’t in legal trouble, they are eligible to sign up for the trip. 

“I know that if you went on a trip on your own to one of these destinations,” Machado said. “You wouldn’t see even a quarter the amount of what you see on one of these organized tours.” 

EF Educational Tours is a program that has been leading guided trips for students and taking them all over the world since 1965. The program’s philosophy is “learn by doing”. They believe a student’s best way to learn about the world and gain experiences and perspectives is to experience it firsthand.  

The overall cost of room/board, transportation, airfare, food, and all the activities included in the trip is approximately $5,000. Machado and Woodward began advertising the upcoming trip almost two years ago. They give lots of time in advance to give families enough time to make up the money. Students are encouraged to fundraise on their own to get their fees paid for, but many just pay out of pocket. 

So far, Machado and Woodward have twenty students officially signed up to go. Of the twenty, there are six returning travellers who also went to Greece in 2018. Erin Shea, who will be going on the trip this summer said she is so excited to be able to experience other cultures through EF Tours for a second time. 

“I have never had an experience quite like the one I had in Greece two years ago. I learned so much and it only makes me that much more excited to go again this summer.” Shea said. 

Junior, Amanda Dale is enrolled and will be going on an EF Tour for the first time. 

“I heard about the Greece trip my sophomore year. I knew a lot of my friends were going and I really wanted to go. I talked to my parents and they said if you really want to go see Europe, then we can save up some money and maybe there will be another option your junior or senior year. It’s my junior year and I talked to my parents about what an amazing opportunity it would be to be able to go this year.”

Kayhi Alumni on Air

Co-host Rose Hamilton works the control board during a broadcast

Devyn Sader
Staff Writer

Common Threads is one of many radio shows aired by local radio station KRBD. This specific show features a playlist of songs which all fall under one theme picked by hosts Rose Hamilton or Nicole Sader, my sister. The interesting part about this show is that it’s interactive, so listeners can call in and guess the theme or suggest a song.
Hamilton and Sader are both unpaid volunteers at KRBD, and both have individual full time jobs. Nevertheless, they both enjoy playing their part in the community by hosting Common Threads.
“Everyone should try doing some volunteer work at some point in their life,” said Sader. “It’s very fulfilling.”
Hamilton added that volunteering not only helps you feel good, but it’s beneficial for everyday things. 
“It’s good for the resume and it’s good for public speaking. It has helped me communicate better with people,” said Hamilton. “I also like helping our community in some small parts. It’s an enjoyable and rewarding experience.”
The two of them joined Common Threads 4 years ago when Hamilton’s boss, a previous DJ of the show, invited her and her sister to come along. Naturally, Hamilton asked her best friend of several years to join them. 
Preparing for a show may seem simple, but Sader explained that there is a lot of precise planning behind every show.
“I usually pick a theme and put all the music together on a playlist,” Sader said. “Then I lyric check and organize the songs based on how they transition into one another.”
Hamilton explained that Common Threads isn’t only catered towards one age group as their audience.
“Our music varies so much from show to show that we don’t have a particular targeted audience,” Hamilton said. “It can usually touch on different generations and age groups. There’s old songs and a lot of more modern day music as well.”
Sader enjoys putting together both familiar and unfamiliar songs onto the themed playlists.
“I like making people listen to the music that I like,” said Sader. “And sometimes I like showing Rose the weird songs I find.”
Common Threads airs live every Tuesday night from 9:00-11:00 p.m. Hamilton believes Common Threads being an evening show can be a good thing and a bad thing.
“We don’t get as much coverage as I wish we did, because there’s not as many listeners at night,” Hamilton said. “But people all over the world can listen, because you can listen to it on the internet.”

Nicole Sader selects a song for Common Threads

When it comes to showtime, each host plays an important role in the show. While Sader usually does all the playlist preparation, Hamilton is responsible for running the board. This means she controls the microphones, fades in and out of PSAs, and makes sure they’re on the air. 
Although Common Threads isn’t a talk show, sometimes the hosts end up getting a little chatty when they check in at the top of every hour. Regular listeners can hear tangents about scary movies or awkward jokes coming from the hosts at almost every check in. 
Usually every show of Common Threads is only run by the current hosts, but sometimes they invite special guests. Hamilton and Sader occasionally invite family members or friends to visit during the show as it runs. I have personally been present for the show quite a few times.
Because of the fact that the show is a pre-prepared playlist, you may wonder what the hosts do behind the scenes when they are live. Usually they are found playing popular card games and cellular apps together. No matter what it is they’re getting up to, there’s never a dull moment while the show is running.
If you are interested in listening to some of Common Threads’ previously aired playlists, you can find them online. The playlists are on Spotify under the account Nicole Marleah Sader. 
You can tune in to Common Threads by listening live on the radio or a radio app at 105.3 FM or on KRBD.org.

The Fantasy of Black Friday

Verona Kamberi
Editor-in-chief

Alert! Alert! Guess what’s coming up y’all… BLACK FRIDAY, or should I say Black FriYAY. Now, you all know that I love to shop. It has gotten to the point where I am seriously considering adding Shopaholic to my name. You know how they say Christmas comes once a year well, I believe that it comes twice.
Black Friday is unbelievable. Everything is on sale and if you look close, that Versace Robe might be yours for just a couple of Benjis. Black Friday is somewhat a dangerous event. Relationships are broken, and I guarantee you that that isn’t the only thing broken. People get trampled over and some, well, they see it as a competitive sport.
No one, and I repeat NO ONE is your ally when it comes to Black Friday. Everyone wants the same items so you have to keep all the sales to yourself. I never thought I’d say this but, I would honestly sleep in a tent outside of a store if I knew they had an amazing sale on brand items. Trust me I’m not a fan of tents.
Even though I live in a small city, as soon as it’s Nov. 24, this girl is going online and is plugging in the numbers. Lord, I could go on and on about Black Friday. Who knows maybe I’ll name my future grandchildren after this holiday, after all aren’t names supposed to have a meaning. I have two tips on how to survive Black Friday.
One, don’t ever leave the house without your parents’ credit cards. Two, shop till you drop.
But sadly… we live in Ketchikan Alaska. There is no Versace. There is Salmon Landing, but is it even open?
I will likely just be at home in bed watching all the Black Friday commercials when the chaos starts and be depressed when it ends, knowing Black Friday is not for me. Yet…
There will be a day, who knows when that day will be, when college is over, college is paid off, I have a job, all that stuff, then I can officially become an adult when I can live this glorious holiday to the fullest.

Life is a Soundtrack

Brittany Slick
Online Editor

Every time I hear “Chasing Cars” by Snow Patrol I’m eight years old again, dancing around the kitchen on a Sunday morning while my mom cooks pancakes.
I’m not actually there. But the song just places me right back in that moment.
Everyone recalls memories by different things — sights, smells, sounds, even circumstances like deja vu.
I grew up listening and accidentally memorizing everything from Paul Simon to Kenny Chesney, all of which became a soundtrack to some of the more memorable moments of my childhood.
Uncle Kracker sang “Follow Me” as my friends and I went to lunch last week and we all found ourselves joining in because we knew the lyrics by heart. This song is definitely not on Pandora’s Today’s Top Hits, as it was released in the year we were born (2000). So how did we learn every word when we had no clue what, “swimming through our veins like fish in the sea” meant, especially as terrible twos?
Anyway, listening to that song took me back to driving out to Settler’s, stopping at Ward Cove Deli for bean and cheese burritos– the smell lingering in the hot car the whole drive out. Who knows if I would have remembered that day at the beach with my cousins had that song not attached itself?
I knew I would remember special moments in my life like my 16th birthday party or getting my first dog, but now, the only reason something sticks is because of a song. I have no other reason to file such insignificant moments in my life other than having music that goes with them.
Psychologists say your memories aren’t your memories unless they are from your point of view, otherwise you’re just remembering something someone else told you.
I think that’s why I enjoy music so much. It lets me be in the memory rather than recalling it; like one does when looking at pictures.
Adults always say that since I’m only 17, I don’t even have a fraction of the memories I will have in my life. And that’s true. But right now, I feel like I have a lifetime of them — and the playlists to prove it.
Ask me what I was doing three months ago, I would have no idea. Play my summer music, and I could tell you exactly what I was doing, who I was with, and my mood with each song that comes on.
If I want to throw it back to middle school, I’ll shuffle my 2013 playlist, blasting Ke$ha and Katy Perry on repeat. If I want to relive prom night, I’ll listen to Heartache on the Dancefloor by Jon Pardi. If I’m reminiscing the Watershed Festival, I’ll get in my car and listen to the entire Traveller album by Chris Stapleton.
If organized playlists aren’t enough, I also have a VSCO (basically an unpopular Instagram) that I post pictures on, captioning each one with a song. I have a song for every picture, a picture for every memory.
Pictures are great, diaries are great — but they don’t satisfy the feeling that music gives me. Now that my high school playlist is coming to an end, I can’t wait to see what my college soundtrack will be.

 

Netflix: A successor to movie theaters?

Screen Shot 2017-11-01 at 12.11.14 PM
A poll from the Kayhi Journalism Twitter account

Liam Kiffer
Staff Writer

This week, Netflix is releasing the long anticipated season two of the hit show Stranger Things. On the big screen, Thor: Ragnarok will be hitting theaters all around the world on November 2nd. There was probably a time when the box office wouldn’t have paid much attention to the release of a show, but now streaming services like Netflix and Amazon are proving to be a threat to movie theaters everywhere. It’s no secret how popular streaming shows and movies have been in the last few years. Netflix has recorded $178 million in revenue in 2017 alone. Streaming services like Hulu, Amazon, and Netflix have made huge profits in the last year, while movie theaters across the country have steadily declined in attendance and revenue.
Junior Maya Parker said she doesn’t attend as many movies as she used too.
“I only go the movies about once every two months,” said Parker. “I used to go to the movies just about every week with my family, but now I watch everything at home on Netflix or Amazon Prime.”
Netflix started as a service that sent videos to customers in the mail in 1997. In 2007, It expanded to streaming movies and television shows online.
Kenny Gross, who is the corporate manager for Gross Alaska Theaters, believes Netflix has an impact on his annual revenue.
“Netflix obviously affects our income. It’s no secret that if someone could choose between paying to watch a movie in public, or watching one in the privacy of your own home, people are going to stay home,” said Gross. “I won’t disclose our total income to the public, but clearly we’re still around, so we can’t be doing too badly.”
Gross Alaska Theaters has three locations in total. One in Ketchikan and two in Juneau.
Candice Jenkins, who is the manager of the Ketchikan Gross Alaska Theater said that she has noticed a steady decline in the attendance in the last few years.
“I’ve worked for Gross Alaska for about five years now and I’ve certainly noticed a minor decrease in the attendance in the past few years,” said Jenkins. “No one’s done a survey or anything to really be sure if Netflix is really the cause, but I’m not sure what else would be.”

Halloween: Horror to Entertainment

 

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Mr. Cron dressed as Mr. Fama (pictured left) & Mrs. Karlik dressed as a troll (pictured right)

Brittany Slick & Keri Thomas
Staff Writers

As a kid, you are told to never take candy from strangers, never go out after dark, and never use a knife that’s not a butter knife. All of these rules are thrown out the window on one specific day of the year – Halloween.
Halloween has some of the strangest traditions of any holiday, yet it is still one of the most popular holidays to partake in. But, why is that? Throughout the years, the customs have developed, now taking on new purposes and meanings. This has made the holiday less dark, and more enjoyable for all the candy-lovers and costume fanatics.

Then: According to Matt Soniak from MentalFloss.com, the tradition of carving Jack-O-Lanterns came from the old legend of Stingy Jack who, after a life of mischief, was punished by having to wander earth as a ghost. People would carve ugly faces in turnips to ward Jack away.
Now: Pumpkin carving today is seen as a fun, family event where kids carve cute faces into pumpkins and put them out as decoration.

Then: Wearing scary costumes on halloween came from the idea that on this night, dead spirits walked the earth. Dressing up was a way to disguise yourself so the ghosts wouldn’t bother you.
Now: Finding a Halloween costume every year now is a fun way to be creative or become one of your favorite movie characters.

Then: On Halloween night or All Souls Day, people believed souls would be wandering the earth before going to the afterlife. The tradition of setting out food for the spirits as they would travel through, turned into what we call Trick or Treating.
Now: Trick or Treating is the main event on Halloween night for kids; full of running around with friends to go get unnecessary amounts of candy from neighbors.

Then: Originally, a black cat was the symbol of the devil. Since cats were household pets, people started assuming the owner of a black cat to be a witch, which they used to help them perform black magic.
Now: Black cats are considered a sign of bad luck, but during Halloween they are used as decorations and banners as a symbol of this not-so-scary night.

Then: The traditional black and orange colors of Halloween came from the idea that October 31st marked the end of the autumn harvest (orange) and the beginning of a dark and cold winter (black).
Now: Although everything is still covered in these colors, nobody really remembers their origin. The colors just sort of stuck.

So why do we still include these crazy traditions in the 21st century? We, as a society, have monetized and commercialized the Halloween holiday, alike all others. The scaring is supposed to be thrilling. The haunted houses and costumes are supposed to be funny. When we carve pumpkins and light them, we aren’t thinking of it as warding off evil spirits. Like wrapping Christmas presents, their only purpose now is entertainment and decoration. We have turned a dark and scary day into a light-hearted parody of its past purpose, making it only more fun and entertaining to society.

 

 

November Culture

Dante Troina
Staff Writer

The last two months, in terms of music and film, have been some of the driest times in culture in my high school career. No event warranted a build up in hype, and many promising projects fell flat. November is the month where the culture is supposed to get back on track, with a handful of album releases, sports seasons in full swing, and blockbuster movies hitting theaters, there are many things planned that should keep the culture moving into December. Here are a list of things I expect to happen before ABC Family starts having their Christmas marathons.

Taylor Swift’s 6th studio album, Reputation, will be her best billboard performance yet… And her worst album to date. It would be no surprise to me if Reputation beats out 1989’s 1.2 million copies sold first week. Music is easier than ever to stream and buy these days (Apple Music, Spotify, TIDAL) and sales numbers for top artists have been at record highs and inflated astronomically since Taylor’s last release in 2014. There hasn’t been a solid female pop album all year, and the last big commercial release was Katy Perry’s dud in June. Swift could easily sell 1.5 million first week, especially with a starved, ever-growing fan base. While Swift may set records, Reputation will be a disappointment. For the record, I’m not a Taylor Swift hater, I could sing every word to the majority of the songs on her last two albums (and who doesn’t love Shake It Off?). I would love for this album to be successful, but none of the three singles up to this point have been groundbreaking or that enjoyable at all. Look What You Made Me Do was a mess of a song, it tried using the same formula as Shake It Off (beat switch, annoyed of ‘haters’, mad voicemails) but didn’t have anywhere near the same catchy tune, and completely abandoned the light heartedness attitude that made Shake It Off fun. The second single for the album was forgetful and doesn’t even deserve a title mention, and the recently released Gorgeous wasn’t bad, but sounds eerily similar to the far superior Blank Space. Taylor has proven to consistently make good music for years, but the experimental phase she’s going through right now doesn’t appear to be working. She seems more focused on the controversial headlines she’s been in (hence the New York Times font on her cover) and, no pun intended, is putting her reputation above making good music.

Frontrunners for championships will be established in College Football… This November is setting up to be one of the wildest months in college football history. With no clear picture of a frontrunner available yet, and only eight teams without a loss, there will be plenty of high stakes games come Thanksgiving time. Most of the races for conference titles are between three or more teams, creating an all out battle royale for the four slots in the playoff. Alabama will have to go into a dangerous Auburn team’s stadium to determine the SEC East winner, Washington and Washington State will meet in what could be their most high stakes rivalry game to date, and there are about 5 teams in each of the BIG-10 and BIG-12 that can possibly take the crown of their conferences.

Here’s my prediction for the final four teams:

  1. Penn State (13-0)
  2. Auburn (11-2 w/ win vs. Bama)
  3. Alabama (11-1)
  4. Oklahoma State / Washington (12-1)

Superhero films, both Marvel and DC, will return in glorifying fashion… Marvel will continue their ever lasting string of good movies, and DC will build off of the pulse that Wonder Woman gave it in June. Both Justice League and Thor: Ragnarok will be solid films, and both will perform very well at the box office. If I were a betting man, the safe choice for one to be a better movie would be Thor, but there is a part of me that is more than excited to finally see a Justice League on the big screen. There will be tons of converted Marvel fans that only want the Marvel Universe to have great movies, but why would anyone not want two great superhero universes? Thor is the closest thing to a guarantee to be a solid film, but Justice League has been all over the place in production. If both movies are made to the fullest potential, November will be one of the best movie months in recent memory.

Travis Scott and Quavo’s album will (finally) drop… And it will become an instant fan favorite. Collaboration mixtapes like this one aren’t meant to win Grammys, but this one will be nominated at next year’s show; maybe not for best album, as it won’t have a concept or touch on social issues, but there will be a handful of songs that are pure gold off of this tape. Every song Travis and Quavo have done together have been incredible, Oh My Dis Side will go down as one of the best songs from this decade, and the preview snippet of Re Run isn’t able to be quantified through words; it sounds like the club song of the century. There are many reasons to be excited for November, but this is definitely the best thing that could come out of this month.