Category Archives: education

Finals at Kayhi

Alex Boegler
Staff Writer

After a grueling semester of work, it’s time to wrap it up and dive into finals. Finals begin on Monday, Dec. 18, and end on Wednesday, Dec. 21. The morning finals will be periods 1, 2, and 3, leaving periods 4, 5, and 6 for the afternoon sessions. Each day of finals will be split into one final in the morning and one in the afternoon.
The schedule for the day will start with a 40 minute study session beginning at 8 a.m. and ending at 8:40 . After the study time, there will be a 15 minute break, ending at 8:55. The first final of the day will begin at 9 a.m. and end at 11 a.m. for a 40 minute lunch break. The study session for afternoon final will start at 11:45 a.m. and end at 12:25 for another 15 minute break. The second final will begin at 12:45 p.m and end at normal release time.

 

KOI at Kayhi

Chanell Browne
Staff Writer

PBIS is a new education program created by KOI (Knowledge Outcomes Impact) that’s being implemented in schools across the country. The goal of the program is to help students focus more in school and to stabilize their behavior.
Principal Bob Marshall said he is excited to implement the program at Kayhi. He hopes it will improve student’s abilities to learn and process new information at school. The program is targeted towards students who lack focus and aren’t succeeding as a result.
“As you know most kids come to school from families where parents are present and have a good foundation, other kids don’t have some of those things,” said Marshall. “It’s figuring out how to help students who have a lack of behavior leading to their lack of success.”
Marshall selected the teachers he wanted to participate in the program. Those teachers received two days of training and instruction in finding effective ways to approach students who need additional guidance.
“There was a site team decided by me so I got to choose teachers that were going to be good leaders in learning what KOI is and how it works,” said Marshall. “Basically it’s a school wide positive behavior interventions and support training. It’s a program that tries to encourage more positive behaviors.”
The site team will meet again in March and the program created by the site team will be rolled out next year.

Ketchikan High School Hosts College Fair

Jaret Warstler
Staff Writer

Ketchikan High School hosted over 50 schools Wednesday at the college fair. The goal was for students to talk with admission counselors and receive more information about the colleges.
Senior Verona Kamberi said that having the college fair every year is very helpful.
“I think it is a great opportunity, especially for seniors that are still looking for colleges,” said Kamberi. “There are so many representatives that are trying to get you to go to their college, all you need to do is just go up to their booth and ask the questions.”
Director Amy Potter from Alaska Pacific University said that having a college fair is a great idea for high schools.
“I think it’s really helpful to get exposure to lots of different types of colleges and universities,” said Potter. “Everyone is unique and finding a good college is important.”         

 

Explore Night Returns to Kayhi

Largim Zhuta
Staff Writer

Kayhi students and parents will have an opportunity to learn how to apply and prepare for college tonight at Kayhi’s annual Explore Night from 5:00 – 8:15 p.m. Explore Night consists of workshops that specify in teaching students about a certain area of the college application process.
There are 10 workshops that will be available: Applications, Admissions, and the Selection Process, How to Survive College without Going Broke, Quality Educational Opportunities in Alaska, Preparing a Winning Scholarship Application, Application Essays, Finding the Right College, Making the Most of Your School Visit, Western Undergraduate Exchange (WUE), Organizing your Senior Portfolio, and Are you Ready for Tomorrow’s (Today’s) World?.
Admissions representatives are leading the workshops. Explore Night will take place in Kayhi’s science wing.

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Campbell wins National Award

 

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Sarah Campbell receives her award. Photo by Verona Kamberi.

Sarah Campbell was awarded the 35th Peace Education Elgin Heinz Award yesterday at Kayhi. She received the award at the first annual Kings for Peace assembly which was held to commemorate International Peace Day. Campbell was recognized for promoting peace and education in addition to her leadership on a national and local level. Campbell said she believes that students are a key factor in obtaining peace.
“Through friendship and connection students can serve as a powerful catalyst for change.”

Senior Year

Brittany Slick
Staff Writer

Senior year has its expectations, anticipations, and the dreaded “senioritis”.
With all the excitement that comes with senior year, there’s also a lot of stress that comes with the idea of college. Applications, scholarships, essays, and admissions are all just stepping stones in the beginning of a college career. Senior Keri Thomas believes the stress of senior year can be hard to handle at times.
“It’s like being enrolled in two different schools at once,” said Thomas. “You’re doing scholarships and early applications at the same time you’re writing essays and doing homework for your high school classes.”
Although the demands of college can take a toll on the seniors, Thomas points out the traditions and special events that will relieve some stress for her and her classmates throughout their last year at Kayhi.
“There are a lot of things worked into senior year to make it fun for us; like senior float and senior carnival,” said Thomas. “It’s the little fun things that come with being a senior that helps with the stress of college and the year ahead.”
Every Class is Unique
Math teacher Jennifer Karlik believes this class has a special quality that is not always as prominent as years past.
“The class of 2018 is exceptionally kind,” said Karlik. “I have specifically paid attention to how this class seems to treat their peers and they are so kind and accepting; it’s really something special to see.”
Karlik said that this senior class is very involved with each other.
“The closeness is what’s setting them up for success,” said Karlik. “If they work together and help each other out academically, they will do great.”
Being a Senior in the 21st Century
Science teacher D Jay O’Brien said he notices some major differences between when he was a senior (1980) versus today’s seniors living in the 21st century.
“I think it’s more stressful now,” said O’Brien. “When I was a senior, we only had to worry about getting accepted into a university. Seniors nowadays have to look at if they can afford going to the school before anything; you have to make a lot of decisions based on the costs and not the wants.”
O’Brien recalls hearing “We Are the Champions” at every single pep rally and only worrying about maintaining a high GPA.
“If you had the grade point average that colleges required, you got in,” said O’Brien. “The scores on the state tests (SAT and ACT) weren’t even a qualifier to get in if you met their GPA requirements.”
Kayhi provides students secondary education in preparation for the ideal goal of students continuing on to college. O’Brien acknowledges that is the one thing that hasn’t changed since he was in school.
“This place has the lights on and the hot lunch all for the benefit and growth of the students to eventually be in this senior position,” said O’Brien. “It’s all about you guys, and that’s never a perspective to lose.”
Senior Roles
Senior second baseman Michael Starr said there are some perks that come with being a senior on a sports team.
“You have more authority and your opinion definitely carries over to the rest of the team along with the coach,” said Starr.
Starr points out that those perks don’t mean seniors can slack off.
“Honestly, being a senior means you have to work twice as hard because the rest of the team is looking at you for leadership while you’re carrying your weight on the field as well,” he said.
In addition to being a big part of the baseball team this season, Starr is also the SBA president of Kayhi.
“As the SBA president, I want this senior class to buy into being a senior,” said Starr.
“Try your hardest to walk into everything with an optimistic attitude, because this year is the year that you will get out whatever you put into it. So make the most out of being a senior and you’ll get nothing but positive energy and good times out of it.”

Advisory Period Kicks Off

Largim Zhuta
Staff Writer

Last Wednesday marked the beginning of the new advisory period at Kayhi. The advisory class was created for the purpose of preparing and helping students set and achieve goals throughout high school and after. Kayhi senior Carlos Orta initially believed the class was going to be pointless. After the class, Orta’s perception changed. He sees the potential of the class.
“I thought it was going to be a waste of time, but once we got into it, it wasn’t that bad,” Orta said. “It will be helpful in planning our future, especially since the careers class was removed. This seems like a replacement for that type of class and should be useful for seniors.”
Advisory classes are split by grade, and each grade has a specific lesson plan. For the seniors, the lessons are going to be focused on teaching them skills to succeed after high schoolーeven if they don’t choose to go to college. While for freshman, sophomores, and juniors, the immediate goal is to teach them skills to succeed in high school. Kayhi senior Nolan Meyer believes the seniors who plan to attend college, have the most to benefit from advisory.
“The studious student who actually wants to go to college and further their education will reap the most rewards,” Meyer said. “They will realize the timeline they have and get going on scholarships, applications, and that type of stuff.”
While Orta and Meyer see the value of the class, Orta also sees a couple of factors that might limit the success of advisory: lack of student engagement and the short class duration.
“I think advisory is a good idea, but I think the students will come in with a negative mindset,” Orta said. “That combined with the short duration of the class might make it hard for it to succeed.”
Principal Bob Marshall had those concerns at first, but laid them to rest after the first class. He chose to make the class 30 minutes because the lesson plans don’t need more time than that. Marshall enjoys dropping in on classes and seeing what they are up to, and what he saw during the advisory hour pleased him. He saw students actively engaged in their lessons.
“The first advisory class went really well,” Marshall said. “I visited the classes and was pleasantly surprised with the level of engagement from the students, especially the upperclassmen.”
Marshall is confident in the advisory class. He has seen the success of the program at his previous school district in Washington, and hopes to see those same results at Kayhi.