Category Archives: Feature

The Nutcracker opens tonight

Domenica Troina and Kelsey O’Brien after their second Nutcracker Performance

Nadire Zhuta
Staff Writer

Freshman Domenica Troina was in third grade the first time she was an angel in the Nutcracker and six years later she’s the lead angel. Troina would have never imagined having the opportunity and said with the higher role as the lead angel comes greater responsibilities. 

“As you get older you have to get stronger on point,” said Troina. “I never thought I’d be the lead role, it’s really cool to think that one year you can go from being in a group dance to working hard to have a solo.” 

Senior Bella Roberts has been a part of the Nutcracker for nine years and said her competitive drive has landed her some big roles in the Nutcracker.

“Some of my accomplishments have been me getting some of the biggest roles, such as Clara the main character. But also the more technical pieces such as Snow Queen and this year the biggest one is Sugar Plum,” said Roberts. 

Roberts said there’s a lot of preparation, time and work that come with being in the show. Numerous amount of hours are spent each day two weeks prior to the show as well as individual conditioning needed to maintain a good amount of stamina. 

 “Each of us dance six hours after school two weeks leading up to performance day. We try to maintain the stamina needed. The week leading up to the show I try to make sure I’m doing extra stuff like running after rehearsals and cross training.” 

Senior Carter Thomas got asked to play the role of a dad by Amanda Dale. It’s Thomas’s first year being a part of the show he said that it’s nothing like the sports he has done before, such as basketball and football. 

“It’s a lot different from the sports I’ve been playing like football and basketball, football and basketball you just play and if you make a mistake you can make it up but with dance it’s different because you have to be at an exact location on the stage at an exact time or it’ll mess up your whole performance,” said Thomas.       

The Parents

D Jay O’Brien whose daughter Kelsey is in the Nutcracker said the preparation needed to be a part of the Nutcracker is a big load for kids. O’Brien thinks that juggling school, dance, and any other activities that kids have during this time is a big to take on by kids. 

“It’s a big undertake” said O’Brien. “[The Nutcracker] it’s similar to march madness, or any of the other big events for athletes such as Regions. Are kids really able to juggle all the things that they have in that crucible week?”

Dominick Pader has two daughters in the Nutcracker this year, Pader jokingly stated that he has been their “personal unpaid uber driver”  throughout their years of being involved in the show. 

The Alumni

Largim Zhuta participated in the Nutcracker his senior year of high school which was two years ago (2019). Zhuta was reaching the end of his high school days and said he wanted to take a chance and venture outside of his comfort zone since. 

“An opportunity arose where I could take a risk and venture outside my comfort zone and doing ballet. I simply saw that I had never done anything outside my comfort, and when the opportunity arose for me to satisfy that desire I rationally took it. It was more of a “What have I got to lose?” process.”

Zhuta said that what the performers did was no joke and that the crucial amount of hours they spent perfecting their performance during “Hell Week” was a lot. Zhuta had never done this type of dancing before so he struggled he even explained how he had trouble with simple tasks such as warm ups. 

“The skill the ballerinas had was quite impressive. I remember doing a warm up routine with the some of the younger dancers and ballerinas, and I remember struggling with it,” said Zhuta.  “I do remember dress rehearsals during “Hell Week” being very long. We started right after school and went on till around 7. So actually if you do the math right there. We spent 4 hours a day at the school that week for 4 days. Then we performed two shows, one on friday and one on saturday. So if you add that all up you get a lot

The doors open for the Nutcracker tonight at 7 p.m.  the show will start at 7:30 p.m. On Saturday doors open at 1:30 p.m. and the show will start at 2 p.m. 

 

An all natural solution

Madison Rose
Staff Writer

For years Kayhi staff member Kelli Auger has dealt with a severe chronic cough. From medications to throat surgery, nothing has helped ease this constant coughing. It wasn’t until Kayhi senior Maia Caballero notice the trouble Auger was having and decided to gift her a diffuser (a machine used to disperse small molecules of essential oils through the air, that way it can be breathed into the body.)

Auger finds that having the diffuser in her office helps her relax and be more productive. Although it does not cure her condition, it has helped soothed and change the atmosphere.

“I enjoy having it in my room,” Auger said. “It makes the work environment more friendly and gives a more welcoming feel to my office space.”

After being introduced to dōTERRA products and seeing them in stores, Auger sparked an interest and looks forward to further research.

“I want to learn more about it and see the benefits it has for others,” Auger said. “I definitely recommend it to other people and suggest that they take the time to invest in this product.”

Ketchikan STAC church staff Beth Fazakerley Is a dedicated dōTERRA user. She not only uses the common oils and diffusers but also uses it as a disinfectant spray, hand soap, shampoo, cream, lotion, toothpaste, cough drops, vitamins and other edibles. She believes that it has made an impact on her and her family.

“I use to have really bad acid reflux, but after taking these vitamins and supplements my symptoms were basically cured,” Fazakerley said. “It helps with a lot of problems, and from personal experience it has kept ear infections, common cold and sicknesses away. It’s nice to have a safe product that isn’t medically prescribed, and actually works. This makes trips to the doctors a lot less and life not as stressful.”

Fazakerley understands that completely switching regular life habits into a more natural herb and oil base one can be intimidating, but she says that it’s worth the research and people should try and experiment with it.

“It might seem like a complex thing, but it’s really easy to get into if you start with one and stick to it,”  Fazakerley said. “It can be hard to remember but after becoming more comfortable with it, you can learn to be more proficient.”

The All Natural Revolution

In addition to dōTERRA, Young Living, Plant Therapy, Rocky Mountain Oils and Revive are just a few companies who are providing people with all-natural alternatives – meaning that their products are naturally made of aromatic compounds that are found in plants and seeds. This goes through a process of extracting in a low-heat steam distillation, while it is pressurized to circulate through the plants materials.

Another known way to produce these oils is to use expression, meaning “cold press”, which is the opposite of steam distillation. Even though this is considered as a type of science, many see it as a form of art that requires skills in harvesting.

The reason people who commonly use oils choose dōTERRA over other brands, is because they are able to determine its superior quality in safety and effectiveness.

Ketchikan Alaska home multi level marketer Dominique King has years of experience using dōTERRA and joined the business of selling these oils because they are a entrusted company that her family can be supported from.

“The CEO sure makes ton of money but they certainly don’t take away from the families involved with their own business, whereas most big corporations are sneaky with their profits and don’t fully share the income,” King said. “This way people can live their lives and get paid fair wage, since we are basically the adveriters employed by the company to make our own business.”

“Anyone can do this, which is why those companies typically fail. But even with the big risk, dōTERRA has been very successful since tons of people want to buy it and need a consistent program,” King said.

She started with selling lotions but made the transfer to dōTERRA because of their goals to create family businesses and provide healing revenues. Their theme is “a healer in every home.” The hope is to get people educated and spread the word about healthy and peaceful living.

“It blows my mind how hundreds of people come together just for this product, and instantly fall in love after using it,” King said. “It seemed bizarre to me at first not knowing what it was, but after being introduced and encouraged by my friends, along with participating in some conventions, I soon learned why people instantly became attached.”

She says that by buying their products you are funding other important associations. This is different from store owners advertising that your money is going to charity, when actually they keep it for themselves. Whereas dōTERRA decides to be independently checked out and look for foundations in need. Research shows that they are consistent with the truth and have proof for what is presented.

“dōTERRA are creators of the healing hands nonprofit organization,” King said. “This helps causes like Days for Girls (DfG), sanitary inspections and anti-sex trafficking programs.”

dōTERRA also uses this money to help support families in need world wide. King says that she loves how it not only benefits her family but also people in poverty.

“Why wouldn’t I want to help people in third world countries,” King said. “The money promised goes directly to those places.”

Wait, teachers haven’t been teachers forever?

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Olivia Kinunen
Staff Writer

Working at a restaurant is hard. There have been so many times when I have been yelled at for “messing up” an order, even if it was not my fault. I hate having to deal with angry customers but when I’m working I remind myself that someday I won’t have to handle difficult situations and customers left and right. My teachers are just like me in that way, they have all had some jobs that weren’t their favorite but those jobs helped lead them to a job they love.

“Every job has its virtues and bright sides,” said science teacher Leif Sivertsen.

Sivertsen said his hardest job was working as a stop and slow flagger when the pulp mill was closing.

“I only had four hour shifts but they were the longest four hours of my life,” said Sivertsen. “I passed time by trying to count as many different plants as I could see on the side of the road.”

Being a flagger made Sivertsen appreciate the hard work and long hours flaggers and other road workers do to keep everyone safe on the road.

“One time I let a motorcycle go by and I switched to stop. The dump truck was trying to come up the hill and the rest of the Harley’s blew right through by my sign,” said Sivertsen. “It was terrible and I felt so bad. I ended up only having that job for a week.”
Yearbook teacher Allegra Machado worked at Subway when she was in high school.

“It was the worst. I had to close the store at night and clean the bathrooms, and it was disgusting,” said Machado. “It made me really respect custodians and people who work for minimum wage. Now when I use public restrooms, I am really cautious about cleaning up because they get bombed and it’s disgusting.”

Machado said that it has affected the way that she parents her children and she reminds them they have to clean up their own messes because it’s disrespectful to leave it for someone else.

Similar to Machado, math teacher Evan Raber worked various small jobs, and a few of them still affect the way that he lives today.

One job that Raber had was working as a night janitor at his college’s basketball arena that seated 10,000.

“I’m a clock puncher, you know, go get your job done,” said Raber. “We had a list of duties and everyday there was a task to do, you were able to complete the task and grind away . . . and listen to books on tape.”

Raber also worked in a supermarket making donuts.

“It was the worst because I had to be there at three in the morning and I was young so I was out late,” said Raber. “I only did that for a few months and I still don’t eat donuts, and that was 15 years ago.”

While some teachers like Raber worked jobs to pay their way through school, Vice Principal Cole Maxwell was tired of studying and decided to drop out of college. He ended up taking a job at Missoula Concrete, where he made concrete blocks for septic tanks. Maxwell worked there for five months and made about one concrete block every two days.

“I stopped going to school and I just wanted to work. Then I had that job and said ‘no I have to go back to school and figure this out,’” said Maxwell. “So the best part about it was it made me go back to school but it was the worst job ever making concrete septic tanks.”

History teacher Leigh Woodward was 19 when she had her most difficult job. She came back to Ketchikan for the summer after her first year of college and worked in Misty Fjords National Monument for the Forservice.

“I thought that I was going to be doing interpreting on kayaks, but when I went out on one of the first trips and they saw that I could hike and work, so they immediately moved me to trail and cabin crew,” said Woodward.

She would spend two weeks out in the field making trails, camping the whole time. Woodward and the rest of her crew could only travel by kayak, and they weren’t allowed to use any power tools.

“I’ve never worked that hard in my entire life, we built trails and spent all day digging for 8 hours. That was it,” said Woodward. “We had honest eight hours everyday and we would have to pack everything, dig holes to poop, and hang our clothes to dry.”

Since Woodward was working such a labor intensive job, she didn’t have the kind of summer that she imagined she was going to have, but is happy she did it.

“It was almost perfect for me as a 19 year old because I probably would have gotten into a lot of trouble that summer if I wouldn’t have been out in the wilderness every single night and not in town with my friends.”

As well as keeping her out of trouble, Woodward said working in the Forservice made her more appreciative of her home.

“I grew to have an appreciation for the outdoors that I don’t really think I had before that,” said Woodward. “You grow up in Alaska and you’re like ‘oh it’s pretty’ but you don’t have a deep appreciation, and I think some of those deep appreciations come from when you’re with people from other places and they’re seeing how beautiful Alaska is.”

Freedom is the Open…Ocean

Sophomore Andy Collins has plenty of experience on the water.

Kyle Smith
Staff Editor

On Andy Collins’s 16th birthday, his dad drove him to the Ketchikan DMV to take his drivers test. To some it is nerve racking, but for Andy it wasn’t anything to be too worried about. Pretty soon he’ll be driving down South Tongass in his Silverado with his music blasting, without his dad as a back-seat-driver.
Being a kid from Southeast with a father as a charter fisherman and a brother who seines, Andy has felt this sense of freedom before, when he took his boat out alone for the first time.
“I have been on and around boats as long as I can remember, when I was a kid my dad used to let me steer the boat,” said Collins. “Now I can go out on my boat basically whenever I want.”
“We don’t have a lot of road. I feel like I have way more freedom with my boat than I do with my truck,” said Collins. “I can leave and go explore new things, go wherever I want too, go hunting in different spots, and go fishing.”
Unlike down south, we don’t have a highway to take us around to 48 states. We have water. Some people like Jonathan Skaggs, who moved out of Ketchikan to Arkansas in 2016, has realized this change in lifestyle.
“When I lived in Alaska, my skiff gave me all the freedom I could ever need,” said Skaggs. “Now I have that same freedom, but with my 2005 Toyota Tacoma. There was so much to do out there on the ocean. You could do way more than you can do here.”
Ketchikan is a relatively small town with only 32 miles of pavement from one end of town to the other. The ocean is the highway from Ketchikan to other towns, hunting spots, and our main source of revenue, fishing.
Rick Collins, the owner of Explore Alaska Charters, and the maritime teacher here at Kayhi, finds having a boat a necessity for living in Southeast.
“I charter fish in the summers, and I could not imagine living in Ketchikan without a boat,” said Rick Collins. “My family has always been a little goofy with boats. When I was growing up we always had a few boats around, my dad was really into them.”
Owning a boat comes with a price. The price for maintaining a boat can be more than some people can afford, and being in Southeast Alaska could limit where you hunt, and definitely where you fish.
“Owning a boat really gives you an amazing amount of recreation opportunities,” said Collins. Unfortunately, owning a boat and paying for maintenance has gotten a lot more expensive over the years,” said Collins.  “Prices of motors and fuel have gone way up, and it’s harder for some people to be able to afford.”
Just like his sons Max and Andy, Rick Collins was inspired by his father and is always out on the water doing something, but when he was younger, it was overall cheaper, which made it easier.
When Rick was growing up, prices for gas were around 90 cents per gallon and maintenance was cheaper as well.
“In the mid 80’s, you could get a 28’ boat for $25 thousand easy, nowadays it would be closer to $300 thousand,” said Collins.  “It used to be somewhere around 85 cents a gallon for gas.”
Nowadays in Ketchikan, people are paying closer to four dollars a gallon.  For someone with a boat and a car, filling your tanks could easily be way too much money.
Gas is a big factor in pricing out a car too and unless you know how to do engine work, or how to do other mechanical work, you’re probably paying someone like Chevron or Shaub to do the work. It could be avoided if you knew how to work on your vehicle or knew someone like Clint McClennan, Kayhi’s auto shop and small engines teacher, to give you a hand.
“I make sure all of my kids know how to change the oil in their vehicles, fix a flat tire, and check fluids,” said McClennan. “It is very important to me. it’s cheaper, and it’s always good to know.”
While Rick was into boats growing up and still is, Mr. McClennan has the same passion. But, his just happens to be on four wheels.
“Before I had a car, we used to hitchhike everywhere,” said McClennan. “But when I got my first car, I was kind of a hotshot. It was a 1964 Ford Thunderbird and it looked like a spaceship.”
Young McClennan saw it sitting in his neighbor’s yard and always watched him work on it, when it was time to sell it, he knew he had to have it.
“That was always my only goal, to have a nice car. Even though I couldn’t even drive for another two years,” said McClennan. “I somehow convinced my brother to buy it when I was 14 from our neighbor, I worked all summer at the cannery, mowed lawns, and worked on other peoples cars, saved up 900 and bought it from him when I was 15. Kids at school were all asking ‘what is that thing?’”
We all need to get around somehow and being from Southeast, the water is our main highway, and source of income for many. If you live down south you may never get to experience what people would say is a blessing and a curse.

Not so new teacher on the block

Photo taken from Kayhi’s wall of top seniors.

Liam Kiffer
Staff Editor

Though this is Anne Elliot’s first time being a full time teacher at Kayhi, this is not her first time within the walls of Kayhi. Elliot graduated from Kayhi in 2003, and was just recently hired as the new long term sub to replace Mrs.Troina for the rest of the 2018-19 school year. Since 2003, Elliot has taught English is 3 different countries, studied at 4 different colleges and even played a little bit of college basketball.
“I graduated from Kayhi and I immediately left and started my life,” said Elliot. “I was so excited to start my life and I didnt really look back.”
Elliot left Ketchikan and began her journey after high school at the University of Connecticut.
“UConn was my first stop after high school,” said Elliot. “I quickly realized I didn’t fit there and made a change.”
After her brief time in Connecticut, Elliot transferred all the way to Arizona and attended San Diego Mesa College. While Elliot was at Kayhi, as well as graduating in the top of her class grade wise, she lettered in basketball, soccer and volleyball. Elliot was good enough at basketball to play in college.
“At San Diego Mesa, I actually played basketball, which was certainly an experience,” said Elliot. “I don’t know if it was necessarily what I wanted to do with my life but I had fun doing it.”
Elliot spent two years at San Diego Mesa and quickly realized that was not where she wanted to be either. Elliot decided to follow in the footsteps of a teacher who inspired her at Kayhi while she was a student.
“After UConn and San Diego, I actually volunteered for the Peace Corps,” said Elliot. “I remembered Mrs. Bowlen telling me all about her experiences working with them and it sounded like something I would be interested in doing.”
Elliot applied to the Peace Corps and was quickly assigned to work in a foreign country in Central Asia.
“It seemed like it all happened in a day, but next thing I knew I was on my was to Kyrgyzstan,” said Elliot. “While I was there, I mostly did volunteer work and stayed there for about 2.5 years.”
Elliot finished her time with the Peace Corps, but was not finished with her time overseas.
“I got a for real, non volunteer, teaching job in a middle eastern country near Saudi Arabia called Qatar,” said Elliot. “While I was there, I taught English and history to high school kids, and spent about two years there.”
Elliot enjoyed her time overseas, but she decided to finish her education and apply to graduate school. Elliot moved back home and subbed at Kayhi for a little while and then was accepted into Columbia University in New York.
“I got accepted into Columbia and even though I was in a 2 year English masters program, I finished in 1.5 years because I studied during the summers,” said Elliot. “I was also able to graduate with little to no student loans because of the money I had saved up from teaching, and with the help of a Peace Corps fellowship scholarship I received while I was with them.”
Elliot received her degree and then decided to stay in the New York area.
“I earned my degree quicker than usual and I stayed in Harlem,” said Elliot. “I stayed for about a year and again taught high school English.”
Once Elliot finished teaching in New York, she once again returned home, and once again left.
“I stayed home for a little bit and then decided to move to Phoenix for a job opportunity, “ said Elliot. “I lived in Arizona for about 3 years and worked mostly online.”
Elliot worked for a company called BookRags that writes and collects study guides and study resources for literature all around the world.
“I was an editor for BookRags and I still do a little bit for them part time,” said Elliot. “Basically what I did was read books and create lesson plans and analyses for them.”
After her three years in Phoenix, Elliot again returned home.
“I wanted to go back home to see my parents and travel the world a little bit more,” said Elliot. “My plan was to stay home for at least a little while and substitute teach.”
17 days after Elliot returned home, she received a call from Mr. Rafter, who is the Director of Human Resources in the Ketchikan School district.
“Mr. Rafter called me almost immediately after I settled in back home, and explained to me the situation of Boyle’s resigning and how that eventually led down to Mrs. Troina’s job being vacated for the rest of the year,” said Elliot. “He offered me the job of being her long term sub for the rest of the year and I accepted.”
Mrs.Troina’s job will be posted again at the end of the year for anyone qualified.
“I am hoping to be able to continue working here and eventually get a regular teaching position after this year,” said Elliot. “I am excited to be there and would love to be a teacher here for many more years to come.”

Super Bowl LIII

Super “Bowl”

Some call it a national holiday. Some don’t even pay attention to it. Super Bowl Sunday is more than just a football game to some people. It’s the biggest day in sports all year. Tons of delicious food, gathering of friends, crazy fans and commercials that people anticipate all year.
Biology teacher and NFL super fan D Jay O’Brien
“The Super Bowl is the ultimate American sports drama. I put on all the outfits, and sometimes I’ve gone to peoples houses,” said O’Brien. “When I root for teams, I think they can hear me. I feel like they can hear my efforts and that I’m having an impact on the outcome.”
Every year, foods like buffalo wings, chili, baby back ribs, dipping sauces, pizza, and potato chips are all served during the popular sporting event.
Junior Alex Malouf says he enjoys eating pigs in a blanket, and pulled pork sandwiches during the game.
“Well I have never been to a Super Bowl party that does not have some form of pulled pork sandwiches” said Malouf. “My personal favorite is pulled pork on Hawaiian rolls”
A commercial during the Super Bowl can cost up to $5 million dollars, which seems like an outrageous price, but the annual sporting event is viewed each year by people who specifically watch for the commercials.
“I love the Super Bowl commercials” said Senior Grace Clark, “Popular brands get to showcase their newest products in front of millions of viewers. You get to see what will be popular on the market this year.”
The Super Bowl starts this Sunday at 2:30 p.m. on CBS, with Maroon 5 and Travis Scott performing at halftime.

-Tarrant Sasser, Staff Writer

Staff Pick 1/28

Who’s going to win the Super Bowl?

Mr. O’Brien: Patriots! “We’re still here!” There are “no days off” with this team. Be sure and “do your job” and root for the Patriots.  Mission 6!

Alex Malouf: The Patriots are going to win the Super Bowl. Brady has the experience and the tools to overcome Gurley and the Rams. Gurley will most likely have a historic rushing performance, but if Brady has the ball late in the game with a chance to win, he will capitalize on that opportunity. The Rams are a young high flying team, but that will only get a team to the big game. It might not be enough to win it all.

Cristopher Carlson: Who’s going to win the Super Bowl? The Patriots. Who do I want to win? The Rams. I already know Tom Brady is gonna do his thing and find a way to come out on top. The man is just so dominant and he turns nothing into something every single year. I think the game is going to be really close because the Rams defense is stacked, they have the best defensive line and some of the best corners in the league and you can never count out the Patriots offense.

Brandon Wieber: I couldn’t care any less… I would’ve loved to see the chiefs or Saints but now I gotta choose. I want the Rams to win only because the Patriots just win so often and I’d like to see another team win the championship more often. Also, Jared Goff is a good young quarterback with a lot more potential and Todd Gurley is a stud. Im rooting for a younger team also with the youngest head coach ever in the history of the NFL. Lastly,  the Rams defense is intense with arguably the best defensive lineman (Aaron Donald) in the league and a very good coordinator (Wade Phillips).

Early morning music

 

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From left to right:  Senior William Biss, freshman Caleb Eisenhower, and sophomores John Call and Judy Meiresonne.

Connor Wodehouse
Staff Writer

The Kayhi Jazz Band is a semi-advanced group of about 30 musicians who come together for zero hour to play and learn under the direction of Ms. Nuss.
Freshman and first-timers Julia Spigai and junior Jalina Williams spoke about early mornings and the jazz genre in general.
“I don’t mind waking up this early, I enjoy the music we play” said Spigai. “I don’t drink coffee, all I need is jazz band.”
“I’m generally not a morning person,” said Williams. “But I get up for jazz band.”
Jazz veteran seniors William Biss and Maurice Meiresonne disagree.
“At this point in school, I’m always tired,” said Biss. “I don’t think I can get any more tired.”
“I do enjoy jazz band most days,” said Meiresonne. “But I am in no way a morning person.”
The band plays several scheduled concerts throughout the year such as the Sam Pitcher Memorial Jazz Concert and a winter, fall, and spring concert.
“I love playing jazz, even when it gets tough,” said Biss. “Learning any music can be hard at first,  but what we do is on another level.”
The band also participates in some outside invitational gigs such as the Sitka Jazz Festival. “Jazz fest is in February, and I cannot wait,” said Biss. “I love going to Sitka.”
“I’m definitely excited for Sitka,” said Meiresonne. “It gets better every year.”
“Jazz fest is one of my favorite trips,” said Williams. “We get to hear the other bands from around southeast and pros from much farther away.”
Local music opportunities offer gigs to the band as well, such as the annual Boyer Company christmas party, which will feature senior Connor Wodehouse and junior Mady Purcell on vocals this Saturday.
“Boyer is awesome,” said Meiresonne. “Three hours of music with local pros for people who aren’t my parents make for some good memories.”
“Boyer is nerve wracking,” said Williams. “It’s not for a grade, it’s a gig. We call in people like Dave Kiffer and Dale Curtis to help out with 3 hours of stress, but when it’s over it feels amazing.”
Certain members of the band have been selected to participate in a new idea from Mrs. Nuss called jazz combos. These are groups of about 5-6 that practice and play together by request. This year’s three combos include The Snack Pack led by Connor Wodehouse, Tuesday Blues With Mady led by Senior Ezrie Andersen, and Swingin’ In The Rain led by Maurice Meiresonne.
“I’m in Tuesday Blues,” said Williams. “Ezrie is a great leader, sometimes it’s tough because the combos only meet once a week, but we still get good work done.”
The band plans to make waves this year with upcoming performances from the combos and the band itself. Ms. Nuss plans to gladly help them do exactly that, but they still have to be in class by 7:00 a.m.