Category Archives: Feature

Senior carnival tomorrow

Pablo Orta
News Editor

Senior carnival will be this Saturday, Oct. 24 from 4 to 8 p.m.. The proceeds from the senior-led carnival will go towards prom in the spring. The largest revenue generator at the carnival will be bingo which will have prizes donated from businesses around Ketchikan.
According to senior advisers, a few things will be changed this year in order to make things easier, the commons and Auxiliary gym will be rearranged in order to make crowds flow more smoothly.
Also, in order to make food purchases easier, only cash will be accepted in order to buy food and drinks. Tickets will cost fifty cents with activities in the main gym costing two tickets and activities in the Aux gym costing one ticket, with the exception of face painting and balloons. 

On the spot: Derek McGarrigan

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By Sage Acteson and Jacob Shay

Staff Writers

Current: What is your full name?
McGarrigan:
Derek McGarrigan.

Current: If you could be any wild animal what would you be?
McGarrigan:
Nothing underwater, but I could be a seagull. Everyone hates them, and I would do it just to know what it feels like to be hated like that. After I turned back I would be like ‘wow, that sucked’ and become a seagull activist.

Current: What is your favorite wild animal?
McGarrigan:
Giraffes, those are fun to look at.

Current: What is the best advice you have ever received?
McGarrigan:
“You’ve got to feel the breeze to know its there.”  -Father, Jim McGarrigan

Current: What is the best advice you have ever given?
McGarrigan:
“Be strong enough to say and do what is right.”

Current: Any pet peeves?
McGarrigan:
Cleaning the house, reasking the same question, and joking around in a serious time.

Current: Favorite Movie?
McGarrigan:
My favorite action movie would be Predator I and my favorite comedy would be Fletch.

Current: Favorite book?
McGarrigan:
Ender’s Game

Current: Favorite color?
McGarrigan:
Blue

Current: What college did you attend and what did you study?
McGarrigan:
I went to Anchorage for about a year and a half, then bounced back between Anchorage and Bellingham. I didn’t have the drive to go to class or the focus I needed.

Current: Favorite past time for out of school life?
McGarrigan:
Either baseball or going to the park with my kids.

Current: Favorite getaway?
McGarrigan:
My favorite getaway in town would be going on walks with my kids. Out of town, we ferry to Prince Rupert and go on a road trip to Bellingham.

Current: Favorite sport?
McGarrigan:
Baseball

Current: How long have you lived in Alaska?
McGarrigan:
Thirty-three years, most of it in Ketchikan.

Current: Where were you born?
McGarrigan:
Ketchikan

Current: Socks with sandals or are you a normal person?
McGarrigan:
I can’t do socks and sandals. I can’t even do socks and slides.

Current: iPhone or Android?
McGarrigan:
iPhone

Current: Pie or cake?
McGarrigan:
Cake, and I would take chocolate over vanilla.

Current: Are you right or left handed?
McGarrigan:
Right

Current: Do you have any pets?
McGarrigan:
I have a teacup chihuahua named Machete Jay and a hedgehog named Sancho.

Current: What superpower would you have if you could have one?
McGarrigan:
I would have the strength of Mr. Incredible.

Current: What countries have you traveled to?
McGarrigan:
Canada

Current: If you were stranded on a deserted island, what three things would you have and why?
McGarrigan:
A blanket, for comfort, fresh water, to survive, and fire to stay warm during cold nights.

Current: What is the difference between a taco and a soft taco ?
McGarrigan:
One is much better, soft tacos all the way. With a hard taco you end up with a fork and plate of nachos.

Current: Do you drink soda?
McGarrigan:
Yes, diet Dr. Pepper and Cola.

Current: What is the weirdest food you’ve ever been offered?
McGarrigan:
Oysters, fresh out of the shell they are disgusting.

Current: If you could travel anywhere where would you go and why?
McGarrigan:
I would visit landmarks around the Mediterranean; the Coliseum, Rome, Greece, Egypt, the whole circuit.

Current: Ethnic background?
McGarrigan:
I am mostly Tsimshian and some Norwegian.

Current: What is the hardest challenge you’ve faced and how’d you overcome it?
McGarrigan:
Within one year I got hired, married, bought a house, and had a kid. We overcame everything by sticking together and talking it out.

Current: What question do you hate to answer?
McGarrigan:
Hey, do you have a minute?

Current: What do you think the most valuable thing in life is?
McGarrigan:
It’s going to sound cheesy, but hope. You have to have hope.

Current: Would you rather live in the mountains or on the beach?
McGarrigan:
The beach, so I can be by the ocean. It’s nice to have water nearby.

Current:Would you rather travel by plane, train, boat, or car?
McGarrigan:
Plane

Current: Worst injury you’ve ever had?
McGarrigan:
When I was 12 or 13 I was running laps in the gym and rolled my ankle. I actually tore all of the ligaments and stretched the achilles tendon in my right ankle.

Current: Favorite food?
McGarrigan:
Cheeseburgers. I really like a double bacon cheeseburger with a fried egg.

Current: How would you describe your humor?
McGarrigan:
Good sense of humor, don’t care if people make fun of me

Current: What are your least favorite movies?
McGarrigan:
Couples Retreat, The Breakup, Killers, The Five-Year Engagement

Current: Do you hunt?
McGarrigan:
I have never been hunting and don’t really know how.

Current: If you could hunt any animal, which animal would it be?
McGarrigan:
Alligator, to get an alligator skull

Current: What would you use to hunt it?
McGarrigan:
A gun

Current: Would you even hunt an animal with a taser
McGarrigan:
A bear

Current: Have you ever tased a bear?
McGarrigan:
No, I have heard legends and folklore of it though.

Current: Would you let me fly drones through the school?
McGarrigan:
Heck yeah.

Current: Remote control helicopters or cars?
McGarrigan:
For now I would have to pick cars, because they are fast and you can make tracks for them. In a few years though I choose a helicopter if they continue to get cheaper.

Current: Is it possible to drown in fire?
McGarrigan:
No.

Current: What are some songs that shouldn’t have been written?
McGarrigan:
I can’t stand almost anything by Pitbull and Marvin Gaye by Charlie Puth.

Current: What is the most ridiculous thing you have ever had to deal with?
McGarrigan:
Probably overly drunk fools, they tend to make life very difficult.

Current: How long have you been a member of the police force?
McGarrigan:
Thirteen years and five months.

Who is your hero?
McGarrigan:
Goku

Current: How many pillows do you sleep with?
McGarrigan:
One

Bon Voyage

A group of fifteen students traveled to France this summer.
A group of Kayhi students traveled to France this summer.

Eliah Anderson
Staff Writer

The French have a history of being grandiose by nature which leads to a history as rich as their cheese. How to be French according to Alison Blair: “Basically be a really big snob and think that you’re better than everyone else, but you also have to look presentable.”
This past summer you could have had witnessed France first hand with Madame Z. and a handful of Kayhi students. For roughly $6,000, a group 15 Kayhi students and chaperones had a one of a kind experience. The group flew to London and from there went to Paris on June 15. Then the trip started to get exciting. Although the group arrived exuberant and ready to go, some of the  luggage did not get the memo and missed the flight to Paris.
“Five people were without their suitcases because the connection at Heathrow [Airport] was too quick,”  said Madame Z.
Several hours later luggage and owners were reunited and the trip continued on without further complications.
In order to get an authentic experience, the group sometimes spent up to ten hours on the tour bus daily. Because the group from Ketchikan was the only group on the bus, they were able to visit extra stops and had a more personal experience.
“It was a sweet trip because we were the only people on the bus. We had the bus driver and tour guide all to ourselves. We were able to load our stuff onto the bus quickly and because of that we got to visit additional stops,” said Madame Z.
The majority of French people don’t ride tour busses but instead choose to lead more active lifestyles.
“French people do a lot more walking, biking and ride on these cool scooters. The French are a lot more active than Americans,” said Blair.
Some of the sites visited were Normandie, Saumande, Loire Valley, Tours, Sarlat Village, Toulouse, Arles, Nîmes and Nice. Humorously enough, the people from Nice were reported to be the nicest. The highlights of the trip included visiting two chåteaus (castles), cooking an authentic French dinner and learning how to fence.
Throughout the journey, the Kayhi students met many local French citizens. Some were nice and some were, to say the least, not. When asked if the French were rude Blair replied, “Yes! Oh my God they were so offensive. I literally got shoved down at the Mona Lisa. In general people were pretentious, especially the Parisians.” However, outside of Paris the people were much nicer and more accepting towards Americans.
An additional  benefit of traveling to another country is getting to eat exotic cuisine. Croissants  were eaten everyday and students were given the opportunity to try new and different foods., “Madame Z tried to get me to eat snails and frogs but I was like ‘no thanks,’” said Blair.
The drinking age in Paris for wine is 16 and Parisians are able to order wine everywhere at anytime.
Spencer Landis was an advanced French student who participated on the tour. Her favorite parts included seeing historical sights and communicating with the native people.
“Seeing famous, historical sites, like the Notre Dame Cathedral and the Roman Arena, which are really old was definitely one of my highlights,” said Landis.
Sitting in French class learning French for one hour a day provides decent exposure, but immersing yourself in the birthplace of the native language provides a much more in depth experience with the language.
“Hearing French spoken at normal speed was really interesting and good for practical purposes,” said Landis. “Having to get medicine at a pharmacy gave a real world example for using the language.”
Blair added, “A lot of the French actually speak a lot of English. If a French person recognizes an American they will often reply in English, even if it’s a student attempting to learn French.” Blair also added, “Even though I tried speaking French they still thought I was speaking English.”
This was Madame Z’s seventh time taking students to France and she said just how important it is for her curriculum.
“[For] Students who can afford to go, it solidifies the things that they learn about France and about the French language [in class],” said Madame Z.
It also helps teach this year’s up and coming class because Madame Z brought back goodies for this year’s Advanced French students. Such items include apple cider and paté, a French delicacy made from goose liver. The two week trip provided a small glimpse of France and historical and cultural knowledge was gained first hand.
“[The trip was] overwhelming at times but really inspiring. It made me want to see more of the world,” Landis said.

On the spot: Principal Bob Marshall

Principal Bob Marshall is in his first year at Kayhi.
Principal Bob Marshall is in his first year at Kayhi.

By Sage Acteson and Jacob Shay
Staff Writers

Current: What is your full name?
Marshall: Robert D. Marshall III.

Current: What is your favorite quote?
Marshall: “Bob, If no one else is laughing, it probably wasn’t funny.”- Robert Marshall II

Current: Any pet peeves?
Marshall: Dishonesty

Current: Favorite Movie?
Marshall: Tommy Boy

Current: What experience do you have in administration positions?
Marshall: This is my seventh year as an administrator.

Current: Where did you graduate?
Marshall: Clover Park High School, Lakewood, Washington

Current: Favorite book?
Marshall: Whichever book I’m reading currently.

Current: Do you have any kids?
Marshall: Yes, three. Lucas, 8, Sam, 4, and Piper, 2.

Current: Favorite color?
Marshall: Blue

Current: What college did you attend and what did you study?
Marshall: Pacific Lutheran University with a degree in Education and an endorsement in Social Studies.

Current: Favorite past time for out of school life?
Marshall: I enjoy spending time with my family, especially with my kids before they grow up.

Current: Where did you grow up?
Marshall: My father was an Air Force technician so we traveled a lot. I lived in Korea for two years, from 1980 to 1982, and spent some time in Canada.

Current: Favorite getaway?
Marshall: The living room.

Current: Favorite sport to watch?
Marshall: Football

Current: Favorite sport to play?
Marshall: Golf

Current: How often do you play golf?
Marshall: Six times a year maybe.

Current: Any experience coaching sports?
Marshall: I coached co-ed volleyball in Hooper Bay with my wife. We did okay.

Current: How long have you lived in Alaska?
Marshall: Nine years.

Current: Where were you born?
Marshall: Wabash, Indiana.

Current: Socks with sandals or are you a normal person?
Marshall: No way

Current: iPhone or Android?
Marshall: iPhone

Current: Pie or cake?
Marshall: Coconut cream pie.

Current: Are you right or left handed?
Marshall: Right handed

Current: Do you have any pets?
Marshall: A miniature Doxen named Mitzi, My wife insisted on a german name because it’s a german dog breed.

Current: Would you rather have a cat?
Marshall: Yes…

Current: What superpower would you have if you could have one?
Marshall: Wolverine’s combination of powers (healing and strength).

Current: If you could be any animal what would you be?
Marshall: An owl because I like to fly.

Current: Do you prefer the summer or winter olympics? Favorite event?
Marshall: Summer Olympics, handball and fencing.

Current: What countries have you traveled to?
Marshall: Korea and Canada.

Current: If you were stranded on a deserted island, what three things would you have and why?
Marshall: I would have my iPod for music, a Bible because my faith is important to me, and pictures of the people I love so I can have something physical to remember them by.

Current: What is the difference between a taco and a soft taco?
Marshall: The crunch. All about that crunch.

Current: Do you drink soda?
Marshall: I don’t drink soda, but if I had to, Coca Cola.  

Current: What is the weirdest food you’ve ever been offered?
Marshall: Either seal in seal oil, or muktuk.

Current: If you could travel anywhere where would you go and why?
Marshall: I would go to Australia. There are amazing animals, nice people, and it’s just generally appealing.

Current: Ethnic background?
Marshall: Caucasian, Scottish, Irish, and German.

Current: What is the hardest challenge you’ve faced and how’d you overcome it?
Marshall: My wife and I experienced a miscarriage. I just had to tell her how much I loved her, and did everything I could to be there and overcome it with her. Thankfully we were blessed with other children later on in life.

Current: What question do you hate to answer?
Marshall: I don’t hate any questions really.

Current: What do you think the most valuable thing in life is?
Marshall: The most valuable thing in life would be relationships, not necessarily just with your significant other, but everyone in your life.

Current: Would you rather live in the mountains or on the beach?
Marshall: Someplace like here, where they are both readily available.

Current: Would you rather travel by plane, train, boat, or car?
Marshall: By plane

Current: Worst injury you’ve ever had?
Marshall: I broke my leg when I was one, nobody knows how. That was the only significant injury.

Current: Favorite food?
Marshall: Teriyaki hot n’ spicy chicken. I can eat that all day long, but you have to go to the right teriyaki place to eat it. Every place does it differently.

Current: How do you like your steak?
Marshall: Medium Rare.

Current: How would you describe your humor?
Marshall: My wife describes my humor as “deadpan”. They can’t tell if I’m serious, and I have to let people in on the joke.

Current: Out of all the places you have lived which was your favorite and why?
Marshall: Massachusetts, there is so much history.

Power scrub salmon

 

Since dishwashers sanitize in a range from 130 to 170 degrees Fahrenheit, clean dishes can result in the byproduct of perfectly steamed salmon.
Since they sanitize in a range from 130 to 170 degrees Fahrenheit, dishwashers can double as salmon steamers.

 

By Cheyenne  Mathews
Staff Writers

My high school years are slipping by fast and soon I will be going to college. Which means I will have to learn how to pay taxes, buy a car, and cook food. Feeding myself seems to be the most daunting task especially with all the health concerns revolving around diets or certain foods. Should I eat GMO’s? How much chocolate is too much? Is there is such a thing as eating too much chocolate? Is eating farmed meat bad? These concerns don’t even begin to delve into the realm of actually cooking. How long do you cook a cake? How do you flip an omelet without ruining it? Why do my cookies always burn?
I have a lot of work ahead of me.
This week I shook off all my worries about food and decided to attempt a cooking experiment that could be fun- cooking the perfect piece  of salmon: tender, moist and delicious. But… with a dishwasher.
I found that the best salmon does not come from an oven but steps away in the device that cleans cutlery.
That’s right, dishwasher cooking leads to some of the most tender and tasty salmon I have ever tried and I live in the salmon capitol of the world Ketchikan, Alaska.
Dishwashers sanitize dishes in a range of temperatures from 130 to 170 degrees Fahrenheit- temperatures perfect for steaming salmon.
The process is simple, find a recipe (my recipe attached below), follow the recipe and then turn the dishwasher on to a normal/high cycle and wait. The added benefit of using a dishwasher is that you can clean the dish you’ll use for the fish. Who doesn’t like warm warm dishes right out of the dry cycle?
If you wash the dishes with soap you should package the salmon in airtight mason jars so that you can still have tender salmon without the soapy flavor.
As a novice in the kitchen I had no experience with what the perfect salmon should look like. Sure, I have eaten a fair share of salmon in my life, most of which was delicious, but the actual knowledge of what a perfect salmon looks like was something I had never paid attention to. So I enlisted the help of my dad, who, in my expert opinion is a great cook. We compared his recipe of baked salmon with asparagus to the power scrubbed food.
The squeaky clean food was better.
I have a theory that putting a piece of fish back in its natural watery habitat makes the salmon come back to life for one last hurrah before it becomes tasty food.

The finished result of dishwasher salmon.
The finished result of dishwasher salmon.

I am not the only one who thinks this way, several internet sites agree as wells as other professionals. For example there are two professional eaters in my house- my brother and my dad. The both voted the unconventional salmon as tastier.
“This one [dishwasher salmon] is better overall, it made the noodles better. The salmon tastes just fine.” My dad said with his mouth filled with the steamy dishwasher food.
They noticed that the separation of flavors was harder to taste but stated that the way the dishwashed food is cooked in jars makes them easily transportable and heated.
Other experts have weighed in on dishwasher cooking including Oprah and NPR sources, so there are plenty of great ‘washed and dried’ salmon recipes to try.
The meal was salmon, noodles and asparagus with cilantro, lime and scallions. The washed meal took longer on the power scrub cycle – about an hour and a half whereas the baked salmon took about 45 minutes. But the time was worth the reward because the washed salmon had a far better texture than baked salmon. The dished and washed asparagus was too crunchy but the scallions turned out fine.
At the end of the meal as I was walking away my dad looks over at my brother and says, “Maybe now she’ll wash the dishes more.”

The Recipe

  • Coho Salmon- we had a fillet in the fridge from fishing this summer, but any kind of salmon works. Cut into slices that fit the selected jar.
  • Scallions- they look like onions, chop these into little pieces
  • Fresh Cilantro- chop up, only a bushel needed
  • Asparagus- chopped to fit into the mason jar
  • Lemon juice- A teaspoon of this in each serving (or jar)
  • Udon Noodles- tear into pieces until it fits in the jar
  • Cajun Seasoning- season after dishwashing
  • Ginger- cut into very small slices about the size of your pinky nail, place one of these slices into each jar


Other recipes can be found at NPR under blogs and dishwasher cooking.

EDITOR’S NOTE:
This is not the same as pressure cooking. Pressure cooking requires different standards of time and temperature to kill all bacteria for a long-term shelf life. Be sure all food is cooked properly before consumption and that your dishwasher is properly working.