Category Archives: Ketchikan

Halloween Showdown

Dametre Williams-Martin
Staff Writer

It’s Halloween, the day the most iconic killers like Michael Myers, Jason Voorhees, and Leatherface (Bubba Sawyer), murder for our entertainment. What if they had to duel against each other?

Duel #1
When running a contest between Michael and Leatherface it’s really a hands down win to Michael due to his overwhelming strength advantage. This is shown by his ability to carry a tombstone. With the ability to take a hit Michael has survived everything from being stabbed to being dipped in acid. Leather face just has no means to compete with the equivalent of a sandbox hero. Leatherface is by no means weak, but he just has no feats of strength or resilience that can compare to Michael

Winner: Michael Myers

Duel # 2
This is the most even fight in this list and that’s between Michael and Jason. Jason has far more kills to his name and more combat experience but Michael carries the strength advantage still. With this matchup Jason’s pure battle experience is a big advantage when going up against two people of equal power. Michael’s resilience is a huge help and allows him to stay in the fight, but he’s not invincible. He falls to the common debilitate to decapitate.

Winner: Jason

Duel # 3
Jason and Leatherface is just a hands down win to Jason. Jason has more strength, more speed, and is more resilient. Leatherface, who’s chainsaw provides reach, fails when Jason brings out his bow skills and his ability to teleport. Leatherface is by far the weakest of 80s slashers. He is pretty much just a really strong human. One good hit from Jason would shred him, where Jason could stay in the fight and keep swinging.

Winner: Jason

With this, it has been decided Jason is the biggest fish in the pond of 80’s slashers, leaving Michael and Leatherface in the dust. 

Low rain causes Ketchikan to rely on diesel power

IMG_0001Alex Malouf
Staff Writer

The City of Ketchikan is on continuous diesel generated power for the foreseeable future. Lack of summer rain produced low lake levels causing the city’s power plant to shut down hydroelectric power.
Stormy, wet days were a rare occurrence this summer. Many days had the potential to downpour, but instead clouds sprinkled some rain and dissipated. Local lakes need strings of rainy days in order to fill up and produce power for the city.
KPU Electric Division Manager Andy Donato said that diesel generators are currently supplying the majority of power to the city.
“Yes we have some hydro power,” said Donato. “But we’re augmenting the diesel with that hydro power. We do not have enough hydro power to meet the firm power requirement of Ketchikan.”
Ketchikan typically relies heavily on hydro power. 97% of all power comes from hydro power, while the other 3% comes from diesel generators. Off years requiring more diesel.
“Nothing is stopping us from going back and forth as we accumulate water,” he said. “As the reservoir level gets low, we go back to diesel.”
According to Donato, Swan Lake will need another 30-40 inches of rain in order to safely make the switch from diesel to continuous hydro power. When asked about the possibility of Swan Lake reaching its goal in the next few weeks, he said it would have to be “a biblical type of event” in order for that to take place.
Typically, diesel power is used in the spring. Lack of water on hillsides and frozen hillsides restrict the amount of water entering the reservoirs.
“Diesel power was needed last year in the spring,” he said. “We usually need extra power that time of the year, but to have this issue manifest itself in the summer and in the fall, that is very rare. Hopefully mother nature will turn around and produce the massive inflows we typically get.”
Donato predicts Ketchikan will continue to rely on diesel generated power as winter approaches, but he hopes the city can switch back to hydroelectric power for the holidays.
“As we get into December and January,” he said. “My suspicion is we will continue to be on diesel power.
Information regarding current lake reservoir levels can be found at www.ktn-ak.us the official City of Ketchikan website.

Who needs coffee? We Do

Chanell Browne
Staff writer

Coffee has become a popular beverage in this generation were living in today.
For one cup of coffee at B&D, it’s about $6. So the question is, how much money do high schoolers spend on coffee a week?
B&D has never struggled with making a profit. B&D barista Elizabeth Young said that B&D collects a high amount a day spent on coffee.
“We make around $1000 a day on a good day,” said Young. “In a weeks average, we make about $6000-$7000.”
Whenever you go to buy a coffee for the first time at B&D they give you a free punch card. Every time you buy a coffee after that, they punch a new hole in the card that you give them. Once you have 10 punches you get a free coffee and enter your punch card into a drawing for a prize or free trip.
A filled punch card at B&D is a total of about $50 – $60 dollars spent on coffee. The business collects close to 120 punch cards just in one week.
“During my shift, I collect about five punch cards a day,” said Young. “Combined with others, we get a total of about 120 punch cards a week.”
With 120 punch cards rolling in, how much of those are from high schoolers? Junior Morgan Tiffany said she finds herself at B&D quite often throughout the span of a week, which stacks up a lot of punch cards.
“I probably go to B&D 5 times a week, multiple times a day,” said Tiffany. “It takes me about a week and a half to go through a punch card, so I spend about $40 a week I’d say.”
Lunch hour is a busy time for B&D because of its location being near the school. Barista, Elizabeth Young said she sees a lot of high schoolers throughout the span of lunch hour coming to get drinks.
“I’d say we see about 30 or 40 high schoolers a day,” said Young. “But during the lunch rush, we get about 15-20 kids just between the hour of 12-1pm.”
Why is B&D so much more popular than Starbucks though? Junior Molly O’Brien likes B&D because of the convenience of it compared to other coffee places in town.
“I like B&D because I don’t have to go out of my way to get it,” said O’Brien. “It’s on my way to school in the morning, and I can get anything I want without having to wait a long time and without having to get out of my car.”
Coffee has certainly made its way into this generation as a favored beverage by not only adults but by teens as well. And it’s here to stay for a while.

Ketchikan By the Numbers

Jenna Miller
Staff Writer

There are 13,376 people in town today.
That would be the 4th largest city in Alaska.
That’s 26,752 eyeballs (ideally) 133,760 fingers (hopefully) 133,760 toes (theoretically) Average Snapchat user opens the app 18 times daily so it will likely be accessed 240,768 times in Ketchikan today.
Jack.ramsay just posted him arriving in Ketchikan on a cruise line.
Codieannie “making his way downtown, walking fast, faces pass and he’s homebound” at Ketchikan Creek.
Ketchikan is light__catcher’s favorite town so far.
The average person has seven social media accounts that roughly adds up to 93632 active accounts roaming Ketchikan.
The average person spends about two hours on social media each day.
If I begged a dollar from each of them, I could fly to the Bahamas ($1441) stay at the British Colonial Hilton Nassau ($186) for 45 nights and back with $3500 for spending money.
Or I could take the ferry to Wrangell and back 110 times. If I wanted, I could get berths take all my friends, and go six times.
I could buy a 2016 Nissan Versa SV with only 34,000 miles on it.
I would be able to pay for one year of college tuition at the University of Nevada in Las Vegas.
1 in 10 people have athlete’s foot making an extra 1,300 people wandering around Ketchikan with it.
This is what I think about when Leah stops and lets half the town cross in front of me.

Crossing Guards

Joey Karlik
Staff Writer

The sun’s out, AP tests are over, and you guessed it! Tourist season has returned! Everyone is figuring out where they are going to work. Some people work behind the counter, some give tours, and others guide visitors across the street. The crossing guards are very important when it comes to tourist season. Without them, tourists would probably get run over regularly. Jacinda Leighton is a returning crossing guard and is ready to take on the challenge again.
“You always know something bad could happen in the back of your mind but I try not to let it bother me too much,” Leighton said. “A lot of people can be very rude and not listen, because of that they can put themselves in certain situations. Nobody wants to be responsible if something bad happens which can be tough”.
Kiely Bryce had her first day on the job recently and is super excited to be a crossing guard this season.
“I heard about [the job] from Jacinda and Leah [Benning] and it seemed fun so I am trying it,” Bryce said. “My first day was good, easier than I thought it would be. I’m really excited to interact with tourists and to get to work outside. I’m not scared but I am aware so I’ll be careful obviously and ready if that time comes.”
Leighton has been on the job since last year. Every day usually runs smoothly and no one gets hurt. However, there was once a time where someone almost actually did get hurt. She recalls her one and only close call with tourists and wants to set a standard for future recruits like Bryce.
“There was this one time at the end of the day, and I was crossing the road. The tourists already crossed and I was heading back to my post. There was this bus driver who almost hit me and then proceeded to almost hit not only the crossing guard but the tourists at the other post while running through our signs,” said Leighton. “It was really bad. I actually had to push the tourists out of the way. We eventually talked it out with the bus company and reported it.”
2013 Kayhi graduate, Jacob Potts, has been working as a crossing guard for quite some time now. He recently got promoted to Street lead for his 5th season. He loves his job and can’t imagine working anywhere else. The sun coming out is making him ready to get back to work and be with his friends in the outdoors.
“All of my friends worked here and with the flexible schedule with good pay. It’s nice to come back here. And as long as your calm, it’s pretty easy and fun,” said Potts. “It can be stressful at some points, miserable in the rain but in the end a ton of fun. The job is easier if your outgoing, talk to the tourists and be funny with them. They love it.”

When In Ketchikan…

Hannah Maxwell
Staff Writer

Ok, you looked online, saw beautiful pictures of clear days, big fish, and whales watching kayakers so you booked your tickets to Ketchikan. Good job. Here’s what you need to know:

  1. The hike to the Deer Mountain trailhead is almost as long and painful as the hike itself. Your khakis and button-ups aren’t going to cut it. Either call a cab to escort you up or forget it. There’s nothing sadder than seeing poor 8-year old Billy being forced up the mountain by his overzealous dad who was a 3rd team all-conference in high school and won’t back down from anything, and mother who looks like a Lululemon model. I have honestly thought about rolling down the window and telling them to turn back now. I never have, partially because it’s entertaining to see how far dad’s gotten on the way back down the hill.
  2. It’s going to rain. Sometimes it rains and rains and rains for 25 hours a day, 8 days a week. Ketchikan averages 229 days of rainfall a year. You may see more rain in the one day you’re here than you’ve seen your entire life. And not that the plastic ponchos aren’t flattering but the locals will make fun of you for wearing it. Zero percent of people look cool while wearing a poncho. So ditch the clear plastic sheath and bring your own coat. This is a rainforest people!
  3. While I’m on apparel. The docks are made of big long boards of wood. There’s a gap between them just big enough for the heel of your stilettos to fall into. So please don’t forget to pack your three-inch heels because I haven’t seen anyone bite it yet and this summer might be my last opportunity to. Shorts are another must. Even if it’s raining sideways you will assert your dominance over everyone by wearing shorts. And don’t even think about packing a hat and gloves because you definitely won’t need them. When everyone is back home telling their stories of their trip to Alaska, they will remember you and wish they were more like you, shorts guy.
  4. Disclaimer, your tour guide cannot summon whales and bears at will. There are no chain link fences in the ocean or the forest, animals can roam wherever they please. The whales and bears don’t care that you paid to go see them. An authentic Alaskan experience isn’t the pictures shown in your brochure.
  5. You will not catch a record-setting King Salmon on your 4-hour charter. Depending on how the season is going, you’ll be lucky to even catch a king. And honestly, once your fish has been processed and packaged none of your neighbors have to know that it’s just a little pinky. Also! In the same way, your whale watching guides can’t magically produce whales, all your captain can do is put four lines in the water and wait. So, don’t bug them about the lack of fish, you’re in Alaska, be grateful.

 

Kayhi Students Prepare for 2018 Tourist Season

img_5314-e1525121199680.jpg
Photo By: Megan Webb

Kyle Smith
Staff Writer

May 3rd officially kicks off the start of the 2018 tourist season in Ketchikan. It’s the busiest time of the year for the people of Ketchikan and students at Kayhi play a crucial role in the tourism industry during the summer.
John Malouf owns several tour companies in the summer where he benefits from employing Kayhi students in the summer.
“It would definitely make my job harder without them working for me,” said Malouf. “They do quite a lot. I hire quite a few high school kids as dock reps, salespeople, and tour guides. They are usually great employees who represent the company name well.”
Students work in a variety of different locations revolving around tourism. Anywhere from selling Ketchikan merchandise, candy, popcorn, trinkets, and working for tour businesses, many students work as crossing guards in the summer as well. During the month of May, students are still attending school. It’s hard for students participating in spring sports to be able to focus on work and compete at the same time.
Port and Harbors Director Steve Corporon said most of the high school students have the qualities they are looking for.
“We can’t load up on high school students or we wouldn’t have enough people for the months of May and September,” said Corporon.
Workers starting off crossing guards will make $14 an hour and work around nine hours a day. Without high school students, businesses would have to raise the starting pay to make the jobs appeal to adults, which can be kind of hard noting that the starting pay is already $14 an hour.
“If high school students were not available in the summer to help fill out our roster we would likely have to look at offering a higher wage in order to attract more quality adults and college-age applicants,” said Corporon.
Being a crossing guard isn’t the most exciting job. It involves a lot standing in the same place in the rain for long periods of time, therefore it would hard to recruit workers from the lower 48. Without students working, jobs like this would be hard to fill.
“Some of the tour companies recruit college students and young adults from the lower 48 looking for an adventurous Alaskan job experience for the summer,” said Corporon. “They often even provide housing for them.  We would not be in a position to be offering housing and I doubt Port Security and crossing guard positions would be perceived as ‘adventurous’ so raising our starting pay is all we could realistically do.”