Category Archives: News

College Life

Alex Malouf
Staff Writer

As incoming freshman Kody Malouf stood in front of the Seattle University campus dressed in Guy Cotten attire from head to toe, with his deer mount and fly fishing rod in hand, he couldn’t help but fantasize about his future success at his chosen school.

“I can’t wait to crush it here.” “This school is going to be a great fit for me.” “I made the right choice on coming here.”

Four months later, Kody transferred to Northern Arizona University. This time, he chose the right school.

This same thing could very easily happen to you, but how are you supposed to know in advance? The only way to find out is to dive in head first and make the most out of every situation you face. However, you have the luxury of hearing first hand accounts from current college students who can offer valuable advice and insight as you ready for your freshman year. So take it from these college students and hear the things they did right, and the things they failed horribly at.

Did I chose the right college?

Kody Malouf
Northern Arizona University (Flagstaff)
Class of 2022
Major – Film

Malouf had it set in his mind that Seattle University was the place for him. He liked the idea of small class sizes and the opportunities associated with that.

“I thought I wanted to go to a small school,” said Kody Malouf. “I thought it would be more intimate and I would get more out of the education being only 8,000 kids at the school.”

The tuition at Seattle University compared to other colleges was something that Kody was aware of going in, but he figured the elevated education was worth the cost.

“The small size and overall school experience isn’t what pushed me to transfer,” said Kody. “In the end it was the cost of tuition. I didn’t feel as if the high price was justifying the education that I was receiving.”

Compared to Seattle University, the overall education he was receiving was not all that different from NAU.

“The education at NAU is very comparable, but my classes are definitely different,” he said. “Size is a factor, but the amount of classes I am taking has changed as well. I am taking two more here than I was at SU.”

Rebranding Yourself

Max Collins
Eastern Washington University (Cheney)
Class of 2022
Major – Pre Nursing

Max was known around his hometown as a get it done type of kid in class and during any activity he was involved in, but your hometown ego serves you little to no good as you begin to plant your roots in your new college life. College freshman Max Collins stuck true to his Alaskan roots as best as he could in the Pacific Northwest. Balancing his classes was not an issue as he sees college as a relief from high school in terms of overall workload.

“Showing up on move-in day is probably your best chance of meeting people for the school year,” said Collins. “This was easy for me, but not everyone has the same mentality as I do. You need to get out and rebrand yourself while not overextending your personality.”

As an incoming freshman, the people you meet right away are most likely to be your social outlets. Creating a network of not only friends, but also other students that can help you down the road will make your experience just that much more personal.

“The biggest downside to my initial experience was that I didn’t meet enough people right away,” he said. “Next year I am going to extend myself further and try to make more friends.”

While some students take it upon themselves to independently create a social network, others rely on organizations they are apart of.

Brittany Slick
University of Idaho (Moscow)
Class of 2022
Major – Marketing
Minor – Advertising

Freshman Brittany Slick is fully engulfed in Greek Life at the University of Idaho which is known for its extensive Greek Life influence.

“The Greek system took up a huge part, if not the majority, of my school,” she said. “It was an easy choice for me to decide to go Greek.”

Slick voiced her gratitude towards her sorority for simplifying the initial stage of getting settled in. The Greek community as whole is a close bound group that extends its arms to everyone involved while mixing both guys and gals together for social events.

“The Greek community is really close and we all live on the same street,” she said. “We do lots of socials and events with other sororities and fraternities so I made a lot of guy friends as well through those kinds of events.

Feeling like a number in a pool of students is something that many incoming freshman dread, coming from a small town like Ketchikan. Brittany’s sorority and college environment eliminated that feeling.

“The community feel is what makes my college unique because not a lot of places can make you feel like you’re at home when you’re in a completely new environment— and U of I does a really good job at doing just that,” said Brittany. “There’s endless opportunities for clubs, sports, media, entertainment, etc, but every college has those. Most large school students can’t say they know someone in every one of those groups—I can proudly say I can.”

Slick feels right at home on her campus.
“I wasn’t expecting to adapt that quick to a whole new environment and school system, but now it’s literally my second home.”

High school vs. College

Mckenzie Harrison
California Polytechnic University (San Luis Obispo)
Class of 2019
Major – Psychology
Minor – Anthropology / Geography

Mckenzie Harrison is a junior at California Polytechnic University. The school has about 21,000 students attending. To her, the biggest difference between the two that is directly school related is the size and layout of the facilities.

“My first day of classes freshman year of high school I went in knowing mostly everyone, even my teachers,” said Mckenzie. “I was like five minutes away from home and knew exactly what to expect. My first day of college was a lot of the unknown.”

Between classes filled with unknown students and having to find her way around campus, Mckenzie was blissfully ready follow the path to success.

“The fun thing about coming to college was so many people all in the same place that all shared the same clueless feeling,” she said. “This helped me to be less nervous.”

Some classes in college such as math are very comparable to high school. She said finding a good study group will enhance your ability to stay on top of your work while still finding time to have fun outside of class.

“If you stay on top of things you will get good grades, just like high school,” said Mckenzie. “It is great to find a really nice support group to have while you are going through tough classes. Math was very similar to high school for me and my study group helped me achieve my full potential.”

Differences between the two schooling systems are more prominent than similarities. The pace in a college lecture is on a much higher level.

“Absences are much harder to make up, material is presented very quickly, and some of my classes have anywhere from 100-500 kids,” she said. “Teachers only have certain office hours that you can go in and ask questions, which was different for me because I asked a lot of question in high school.”

Academic differences aside, the college experience is nothing like high school.

“I have way more independence and “free” time depending on how I use it,” said Mckenzie. “I attend a school with a lot of kids, so I have to get used to not seeing people that I know all the time.”

Creating and living your own adult life

College is more than just class, its is also full of concerts, road trips, conventions, and much more.

Slick is already forming a game plan to improve her next year in Moscow.

“My free time in the first semester was mostly going to all the events I could to get to know new people or get to know my new friends even more,” she said. “I wanted to work on building solid relationships and putting myself out there so that I could feel like I found a place to belong and people to belong with.”

She plans on expanding her horizons off campus during her sophomore year.

“My free time in second semester was filled with actually getting off of campus and exploring more of the area I was in,” said Brittany. “I had an easier schedule second semester, so that gave me a lot of time to go on drives and see new places. I went all over Northern Idaho and into Washington. Getting to see where my new friends grew up and how different their towns are was a great experience, compared to what i’ve known my whole life.

Individual class load and degree path yield different levels of free time, especially as you indulge further into your college years.

Jenny Hu
Arizona State University (Temp)
Class of 2018
Major – Kinesiology

Arizona State University senior Jenny Hu took a very practical view towards how she planned to live her college life. Her freshman and sophomore years were consistently filled with frat parties and social events. During her last two years, Jenny found herself hitting the books more than she expected.

“I assumed I would continue to expand on exploring opportunities, but I was mistaken,” said Jenny. “The second half of college there wasn’t much free time. Honestly, I tried to catch up on as much sleep as possible with the majority of my free time.”

Location dictates your ability to explore the surrounding areas of your college just as much as class load and school involvement.

Collins noticed an obvious change in pace and lifestyle from the beginning of the year to the end. His transition from settling in to becoming more independent happened naturally.

“The first half of my school year, I mainly just became an adult and did what I wanted to do,” said Max. “The second half, I focused on achieving personal goals like road tripping, camping and skiing.”

The area and culture provides easy access to activities similar to those back home for Max.

“Adapting my style of off campus life from Alaska to Washington was just as easy as I expected.” he said. “A good number of the things I love to do back home are just as available here. That and the endless amount of area to cover while doing those type of things is great for my lifestyle.”

Prepare in advance

After graduating high school, you have a good chunk of time to plan for your journey to college, wherever that may be. Approaching college like a big vacation may be helpful to your success in getting settled in. Having a rough plan that outlines activities and facilities that are available on campus is a great start.

Slick was glad that she had a general idea of what was to come once she arrived. However, going with the flow is extremely beneficial.

“I thoroughly stalked the websites and social medias of my college looking for more information,” she said. “It was a great start, but it kinda psyched me out and I got a little nervous from it. I ended up following what I knew already and made the experiences my own instead of trying to recreate what I saw online.”

Making the experiences your own adds depth to your college life. The connections will come eventually.

“You just gotta go with the flow and let connections happen, you shouldn’t force anything.”

Planning your social life shouldn’t be your main focus. Brittany found herself wishing she spent more time thinking about her budget.

“You think you will manage your money well between scholarships and tuition and books and everything, but you get off track quickly,” she said. “I wish I would’ve set a monthly budget plan before going to college so that I spent my money more wisely in the beginning rather than having to compensate at the end of the school year for spending so much.”

A quick tip Brittany hopes to share with incoming freshman is packing.

“Start packing early, it comes up quick and if you slowly pack, your life will be so much easier,” she said. “Pro Tip: Everything you wanna hang up, LEAVE ON A HANGER and pack them. Then you can just hang them up when you get there. That trick saved me a lot of time.”

How college changes you

Everyone adapts to college differently. Part of that process is embracing the change. Everybody changes, and change is good.

Slick had the most to say about change. She credits the change to not only the college lifestyle, but also her ability to initiate that transition in her life and the influence of new friends.

“I have already grown so much as a person from the time I left to the time I came back,” said Slick.

“I feel that I have zoned in more on my values,” she said. “ I learned to be familiar and confident with the idea of being independent.”

Staying true to your roots is something you should cherish as you enter an environment as hostile as college can be. Kids from small towns have no problem integrating this into their new found life.

“I think one part of me that has never and will never change is my appreciation for home and the people that made me who I am today,” said Slick. “Ketchikan is such a unique place, and now that I’ve lived away from home, I’ve learned to cherish it more because it is unlike any other town.”

Harrison feels that she has matured quite a bit since attending college, like most people do.

“Since coming to college I feel that I have matured a lot, but also learned so much more about myself,” she said. “I have really had to prioritize what is important to me and what I really need to focus on. I value my upbringing even more than I did before, and I value time spent with my family when possible.”

College has a tendency to change your perspective on many things, including your place in the world.

“You realize how small your personal world really is, and that there is a huge world outside of you.”

Words of wisdom for incoming freshmen

Kody Malouf – Don’t sit in your dorm room all day. Kids complain about how they don’t like college because they don’t do a lot. Sit next to someone who looks cool in your classes and get to know them. Meeting people is easy, so do it.

Brittany Slick – Put yourself out there as much as you can and seek out opportunities rather than trying to wait for them to come to you. Everyone is in the same place so don’t be afraid to reach out to people and start a conversation!

Jenny Hu – LOL don’t go to college, it’s a trap

Max Collins – Meet as many people as you can, even if you dread doing it. Organize your time so you can do good in school, but still have fun.

Dante Troina – It’s easier than you probably expect, but that doesnt mean slack off. Since everything down there depends on you,you can easily screw up. As long as you have a basic understanding of what’s going on, you’ll be fine.

Mckenzie Harrison – College is an investment in yourself and in your future. I encourage you to have as much fun as possible, but to always push yourself to excel in academics. The time goes so much faster than you realize, so get out of your comfort zone, and stay true to yourself. Try new things, purposefully have conversations with people who have differing opinions, educate yourself on anything and everything, and most of all realize you are 100% capable of doing what you set your mind to. It is so important that you start healthy habits your first year, because they tend to follow you the next three. Knowing your self worth and staying confident will help you navigate these years. It’s okay to ask for help, to be homesick, to be discouraged by all the new work, to go to counseling, and/or tutoring.

 

SBA Elections Today

Class elections for SBA will be happening today during Advisory.
All positions are unopposed except for Senior Class President, and Parliamentarian. Juniors Carter Thomas and Talisa McKinley will be running against each other for Senior Class President, and junior Laura Sherill and sophomore Henry Clark will be competing for the role of Parliamentarian.
Voting will start at the conclusion of speeches. Winners will be announced Friday after school. 

Future Of Halibut

A halibut being caught. Photo taken by Carter Thomas

Carter Thomas
Staff Writer

Two anglers decided to rent a boat and go halibut fishing. After the long day of reeling in their limits, they headed back to the dock. They pulled up right next to Rick Collins’ boat, packed with four out-of-state fishermen. They watched as they unloaded 4 halibut averaging 25-30 lbs each (all under the legal limit of 38” each). Then, his clientes watched the 2 fisherman, mouths drooling, as the two of them heaved and pulled out 4 big ones, averaging 60 pounds a fish. Under the current system and regulations, this happens constantly, leaving guided fisherman and their captains unhappy. Some aim to balance the playing field and even up the regulations between the two sectors.

New Regulations

Since the implementation of the catch sharing plan in Jan of 2014, there seems to have been an increase in the number of rental boats. New legislation has been proposed to register all rental boats, and align the rental fleet’s catch limit with the charter fleet. Initial discussions on this legislation will be discussed during the North Pacific Fisheries Management Council’s (North Council) next meeting in October. Because halibut is a federally regulated fish, the State of Alaska cannot discriminate between resident and non-resident. Instead, new regulation must target means and methods of fishing. Jeff Wedekine, a board member on the Alaska Charter Association and owner of Chinook Shores Lodge in Ketchikan, supports the registry as long as it isn’t too time consuming or cost prohibitive.

“There is a proposal to identify how many rental boats there are by making them register, and then within that proposal was also a secondary proposal to align the rental boat catch limits with the charter boat catch limit,” said Wedekine. “I’m all for them wanting to register the boats as long as they can do it in a manner that’s not going to cost us a ton of time and a ton of money unnecessarily.”

Although Wedekine supports the registery, he does not agree with the alignment of the charter and rental catch because of the lack of data on the issue.

“I am not for aligning our catch with the charter boats because we have no idea how many fish we are actually catching.”

Andy Mezirow, a charter representative on the North Council, said that even though he doesn’t have hard proof, he believes a registration and limiting entry is vital to fixing the issue.

“We need to at least create a registration and probably are going to need to limit entry to the existing participants so that there isn’t a continued growth in that sector,” said Mezirow. “There has been a large growth of rental boats since the catch sharing plan was put into place. We have to figure out how many of them there are.”

Each year an annual catch limit is established for each management area.  Estimated harvest by subsistence and recreational anglers is taken out before the remaining quota is divided between guided recreational and commercial fishermen as outlined in the catch sharing plan.  Forest Braden, a charter operator and the executive director at Southeast Alaska Guides Organization (SEAGO), believes subsistence might not be a legitimate way of living nowadays.

“I think in times of low abundance, there should be regulation for everyone using the resource. I’m not sure subsistence is truly subsistence in southeast right now,” said Braden. “The way I hear some people using it, it seems to me like everyone needs to be careful (with the resource) in times of low abundance.”

No Data

One issue many have with the proposal to decrease the rental fleet catch is that there is little-to-no data on how much fish they are catching or how big the fleet is. Mezirow said that the fleet is rapidly growing in the eyes of local alaskans.

““That’s just my hunch, and I don’t have facts to back that up, but when I talk to people in Southeast Alaska there are a lot of new rental boats.”

Wedekine said that he believes the North Council may be making up an issue to reduce the catch.

“They are scared that people are using the rental boats as a way to circumvent the charter rules,” said Wedekine. “I think they are making up an issue that doesn’t really exist in an effort to reduce our catch.”

Wedekine also said the reason rental boat business owners are so upset is because of the lack of data. It seems to them the North Council is targeting their fleet.

“There is absolutely no data or proof that people in rental boats catch any more fish than people that are just fishing in there own boat or a borrowed boat,” said Wedekine. “It sounds like they are creating a lot of concern without any data. That’s where a lot of the rental boat guys are having heartburn.”        

Local Businesses Effected

Alaska businesses have already felt the negative impacts of lower fish regulations. Some guided fishing business owners have started offering some non-guided options to retain clients who were looking for more opportunity.  Braden, Wedekine, and many other business owners in this sector believe the proposal would hurt their business further.

“As a charter operator, I have lost clients to non-guided operations because the limits matter to them. It has hurt my business severly,” said Braden. “I’ve lost people to non-guided operations and i’ve just plain lost people because the regulations are too strict.”  Operators like Braden are worried that these additional regulations on non-guided boats will further impact their businesses.

Jeff Wedekine takes it even a step further.

“If they aligned the catches, many people will have to throw back the only halibut they catch all week. The charter boats have an edge because they know where the small fish are, and run 30 miles to do it. Most of the rental boat guys have no idea where to find these fish,” said Wedekine. “I think it would be a disaster for our clientele. People would get very frustrated and possibly not return.”

Other Alternatives

There are other alternatives that may be more attractive to some Alaskans. Mezirow would like to see a different approach for the rental fleet, like lowering the limit over time instead of aligning the bag catch with the charter fisherman immediately.

““There are a broad range of alternatives from no action to creating a registration and aligning the bag limit with charters, which I think is probably a harsh way to go about it,” said Mezirow. “ I’d like to see a softer landing for the rental boats, like lowering the bag limit incrementally over time.”     

Mezirow also said that he would like if the council took a broader view and encapsulated more fisherman, such as yachts and condos into the proposal.

“I think what they need to do is create a regulation that takes a broader look at it, because it’s not just rental boats,” said Mezirow. “There are also Yachts that come up and operate as time shares or condos. There are all these variations of businesses that profit from retaining halibut.”

Some Alaskans think that a “one fish for all” recipe would be the most beneficial outcome. Wedekine said that he is all for conservation and sharing, but that the rental fleet shouldn’t be targeted.

“ If the halibut population is that bad, maybe they should go one fish for everybody, whether they are renting a boat or not,” said Wedekine. “I understand sharing and conservation, but I don’t understand targeting a specific group and making them the bad guy.”

Mezirow and the other 10 voting board members on the North Council will discuss and potentially vote on these issues in October.

Year in review

The 2018-2019 school year started off with an element of turmoil. However, Kayhi showed its resiliency and had one of the best school years, academically and athletically, maybe in school history.

News Of The Year:

  1. Jason House will be the new Kayhi principal next school year. House taught science in Barrow in 2001-2004, he will be currently moving up from Arkansas.
  2. Kayhi’s NOSB team won the state championship and competed at Nationals. 
  3. Former culinary teacher, Doug Edwards was sentenced to jail for 18 years with 12 suspended.

Sports Stories Of The Year:

  1.  The boys basketball team won a state championship after beating Dimond 57-53 in an overtime thriller for the first time since 1974.
  2. Kayhi cheer also won the state championship. 
  3. The Kayhi boys soccer team qualified for the state tournament for the first time ever.

Weekend Sports Preview

Girls Soccer

The Lady Kings soccer team (3-9-1) play their last regular season games this weekend against Thunder Mountain at Esther Shea Field. The Lady Kings will take on the Falcons tonight at 5 p.m. Kayhi will be honoring eight seniors on Saturday at 5 p.m.
The Lady Kings are 0-2 against Thunder Mountain this season.
Senior captain Olivia Kinunen said their record against the Falcons has given the team motivation.
“We are pretty even with TM so it’s nice to be able to potentially get a win for the last games of my high school career,” said Kinunen. “We aren’t relying on that though, and we’re going to work hard like we do when we play JD.”
Kinunen said senior recognition will be a very emotional night for her.
“My dad has been my coach and mentor ever since I was little,” said Kinnunen. “I just want to make the most out of these last games and make him proud.”

Friday
Varsity: 5 p.m.
Jv: 1 p.m.  

Saturday
Varsity: 5 p.m.
Jv: 1 p.m.

 Boys Soccer

Boys Soccer will play their last games this year against JD at home. If Kayhi were to upset JD this weekend, they would not be able to travel to the state tournament for the first time in history. Junior Sullivan Schulz and the rest of the team plan to do just this.
“We plan to score goals, thats all weve been practicing all week,” said Schulz. “We would love to send JD home empty handed.”
The kings will kick off at 7 pm.

Track

Kayhi track will defend their region title this weekend against Juneau TM and the rest of the southeast teams today and tomorrow. Events will start at 10 a.m. This meet will determine who goes to the state tournament. Placing top 3 in an event will punch your ticket to Anchorage. Senior Crist Carlson ( former 110m hurdle champion) said that he can defend his title, and that the team can come out on top again if they battle.
“I think I have a very good chance at winning regions in the 100m again,” said Carlson. “Its gonna be a hard fought battle this weekend, but I believe our boys can come out on top again. It’s just going to be extremely close because its so competitive this year.”
Senior Brendan Wong, a defending shot put region champion, said that the team has the tools necessary to pull off another win as long as everyone pulls their weight.
“We have the talent, we just need to execute,” said Wong. “I expect our to do good if everyone does their part.”
Senior Ivers Credito took 1st place last year in the 300m hurdles.  He plans to just plain outwork his opponents.
“Im just going to go out there and give 110% in every race and try and improve,” said Credito. “There are a lot of other athletes that are running well this year, but I think I can beat them.”
Sophomore Rachel Knight, who qualified for state in the 400m dash last year, said she might not be able to qualify again but shes going to give it her all.
“This year my chances for state are very low,” said Knight. “You won’t always make it, but you can give it your all.”
Knight said that the girls team will have a difficult time because their team is much smaller than TM or JD’s.
“I do believe that we can beat our scores last year, however our girls compared to TM and JD are very low.”

Friday event times:
10:00 am- Field events
12:30 pm- Shot put/triple jump
3:00 pm- Running events

Saturday event times:
8:30 am- Field events
11:00 am- Running events

Softball

The Lady Kings host the Sitka Wolves this weekend at home. Kayhi and Sitka split in their last matchup. The games will be tonight at 6 p.m. and Saturday at 12 p.m. Saturday will be senior night.
“This weekend will definitely be weird,” senior Jenna Miller said. “I’ve been playing on this field for 12 years now, and I only have three more games left. It’ll be sad but I think this weekend is going to make me appreciate the game and community more than I have in the past.  

Soccer Nets First Wins

Carter Thomas
Staff Writer

Boys soccer (2-9-1) went 2-2 in the Mat-Su Valley over the weekend.
Junior Sullivan Schulz said that it felt great to finally get a few wins in the books.
“It was great to win against Houston and Redington,” said Schulz. “It would have been nice to beat Barlett because we lost by 1 in the final minute of the game, but overall im proud of how our team competed.”
The Kings last games will be this weekend against Juneau Douglas. This season they are 0-2 against JD. Schulz and the rest of the team will remain optomistic about these last games in hope of a win.
“I don’t think our record accurately repesents our team, we have just had a tough schedule this year,” said Schulz. “It would be great to beat JD this weekend, because if we beat them they can’t go to state. We will have Brayden Linne back, so we should have a good shot.”

Pensinsula games:
Houston: 4-1 W
Redington: 8-2 W
Chugiak: 2-0 L
Bartlett: 2-1 L

Regions Next up For Track

Carter Thomas
Staff Writer

The meet wasnt exactly the send off the seniors wanted, due to a ferry breakdown that resulted in other teams not making the event. Senior Cristopher Carlson said this meet wasn’t taken completely seriously beacuse it was against Petersburg.
“This meet just wasn’t very competitive,” said Carlson. “It was more like a dress rehersal rather than an actual meet.”
Because the meet was so chaotic, they did not keep overall team scores. Instead, members of the track team worked on PR’ing in their own events. Hunter Mathews injured his knee in his final long jump of the meet. He is an important point scorer for the Kings, and would be missed if he were to not attend regions in Juneau.
“If he cant go to regions our coach will put our best athletes and we will practice all week to try and fill that void,” said Carlson.  “He would be missed a regions, but well have to step up and make it up in other events.”
The Kings next meet will be in Juneau for the Region V tournament for all southeast teams. The top 3 from each event will be in attendance.