Category Archives: News

Next Week’s Testing Schedule

Kayhi freshmen will be doing PEAKS testing next week on Tuesday and Wednesday. Students will follow this schedule for testing days.

Tuesday: (Classes 1, 3, 5 will meet)
1st hour = normal
2nd – 4th hours = 9th testing or “alternative activities” for 10-12
Lunch = normal time
5th hour = actually 3rd
6th hour = actually 5th

Wednesday: (Classes 2, 4, 6 will meet)
1st hour = actually 2nd
2nd – 4th hours = 9th testing or “alternative activities” for 10-12
Lunch = normal time
5th hour = actually 4th
6th hour = normal

Kayhi NHS Inducts New Members

Tug Olson
Staff  Writer

Thirty-four students were inducted into National Honor Society Tuesday night.
Kayhi Chapter Adviser Sarah Campbell said she is very pleased with this year’s inductees.
“Overall I was really proud of the students, and proud of them for conducting themselves with confidence, poise, and kindness,” she said. “The strength of any group is the power of its members.”
NHS was founded in 1921 as an organization to recognize outstanding juniors and seniors. The four pillars that represent NHS members are scholarship, leadership, service, and character. Senior Sarah McClennan claimed it an honor and something she wants to include on her resume.
“Last year, because I was rejected, it gave me something to work for and look forward to for this year,” she said. “It’s cool to finally be recognized for something that is your own doing”.

Pricey Hunting

Jack Carson
Staff Writer

For the first time in 20 years, the Alaska Fish and Game raised the prices to buy a hunting and fishing license. Fishing licenses have been raised to $29 from $24 for a resident of the state and for a non-resident, a 14 day fishing license will go up to $50, double the price of original.  Hunting licenses are now increased to $45 from the original price of $25. You might be thinking “What the heck? That’s another $20!” but just be thankful you are a resident. If you’re a non-resident, you get to pay $160, terrible price huh?
That’s what I thought when I was looking at all the prices, then I decided to do some research on prices in other states and I changed my mind. Be thankful that you don’t live in California or Oregon, if you are a big hunter. California’s price for a resident hunting license is $47.01 and $163.65 for a non-resident. On top of that, a resident has to pay $31 PER TAG and non-residents get to pay an astonishing $276.05 per tag. Yeah, no thank you. If you live in Oregon, it doesn’t get much better. Residential hunters pay $32 for a license while non-residents pay $160.50 for a license. Also, if you are a resident wanting to buy one buck tag, it’s $26.50 and for a non-resident to buy just one buck tag it is $414.
Down south they have some crazy prices compared to up here in Alaska, especially if you’re a non-resident. I couldn’t even imagine paying that much for only one tag. I was going to put Montana in here but even wanting to get a license there requires a good deal of work and is incredibly complex.

The Book is Better… Most of the Time

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By Dante Troina
Staff Writer

The Golden Compass was such a terrible movie, I didn’t bother reading the book. That is the problem often times when a book is turned into a movie. In most situations, movies don’t live up to expectations created by the book. There are many prime examples of books that have been turned into terrible films.
For every book that is made into a great film, such as The Lord of the Rings Trilogy or The Harry Potter Series, there are just as many that are adapted to screen, and don’t share the same success.
Percy Jackson: The Lightning Thief was everyone’s favorite book in my fifth and sixth grade elementary school classes, and I remember going on a field trip to the theatre as a class to go see the first film when it came out. What I remember most however is leaving the theatre and, for the first time, I’d had a terrible experience. The mess of the movie that is The Lightning Thief made me realize that not all great books are as great in movie form.
English Teacher Linnaea Troina believes that the film wasn’t even comparable to the novel.
“I was very excited to take my fifth and sixth grade class to see The Lightning Thief, but after seeing the movie, I didn’t even feel like I had just watched a film based on the book,” said Troina.
Junior Largim Zhuta, who loves watching and analyzing films, thought that The Lightning Thief didn’t capture the world in the same way the book did.
“There’s something about the movie that just doesn’t make you care as much, it doesn’t set up or get you interested in the world.”
There are many other films that pale in comparison to the book.
Junior Sarah Kuharich claimed that Ender’s Game film lacked value in characters.
“When I watched the movie, I was immediately turned off to it, because of the fact that it didn’t have the same characterization that the book did,” Kuharich said.
Some books turn out as better movies, which people mainly seem to think is a direct result of great characterization, but also, it’s a result of movies sticking to the books. Films often get criticized for not developing the characters as well as the books do, and also not capturing what the novel was about.
Junior Luke Reynolds, who wants to be a scriptwriter in the future, gave many examples about books that have been adapted into films very well.
“Obviously there are films such as The Lord of the Rings Trilogy and The Harry Potter Series that have done it better than others,” said Reynolds. “But there are more examples, like The Martian and The Wolf of Wall Street that are very great adaptations.”
Zhuta and Reynolds also gave insight on what makes a good film.
“What makes a good book into a great film is likable characters, while having them look and act accurate to what their on page counterparts do.”
Reynolds agreed with Zhuta, then talked about how the setting is important as well.
“Also, what is important is the universe around the characters, because if you don’t care about what is going on around your protagonist, or if it is a dull setting, then you don’t get as invested in the film,” said Reynolds.
Some luxuries that books have is that they don’t have as much time constraints when creating a universe, the author can spend as much time as they need creating a setting and evolving characters. An average length of a film is 146 minutes, which is two hours and twenty-six minutes. That means that the director has to sometimes squeeze up to ten hours worth of story and turn it into a two hour film.
Add that on top of the pressure that a fan base of a good book can generate, and that’s what an average novel-turned-film faces. There are many reasons why some films haven’t been as successful as their on page counterparts.
Taking all of this into account, it is a difficult task to turn a novel into a film, and not all novels are meant to be turned into great movies.

Cops and Clowns

By Joey Karlik
Staff Writer

Two weekends ago, the sinister clown epidemic hit Ketchikan. Two kids were spotted running away from the Recreation Center, and told their parents that two scary looking clowns were behind the rec-center. The clowns did not do anything to them they said, but just the sight of them sent the little kids away in fright. Is there more clowns to come? Kayhi’s school cop, Officer McGarrigan, certainly doesn’t believe so.
“I think it’s a stupid trend and someone’s going to get hurt, most likely a clown. The reason why is that kids are going to get scared when they see the clowns and the parents are going to do anything to protect our kids,” said the officer. “Even if that means going to drastic measures”.
With Halloween on Monday, parents are nervous about their kids encountering these “threats” while out trick-or-treating.
“We don’t expect anything to happen this weekend but we are keeping a very tiny eye out for it,” said McGarrigan. “I know it looks like a perfect time for people to strike and get away with it but I don’t believe people in this town are that stupid.”
The events are labeled as high schoolers’ shenanigans by some community members. Police officers are suggested to take an assembly and discuss the matter with the kids.
“We believe that you guys won’t be stupid and won’t need that talk,” Officer McGarrigan added. “You guys are around 16-17 year olds and are educated and understand that we won’t need to do cautionary things about this so called ‘epidemic’.”
With speculation all around the U.S, the next big question is where will the clowns strike next, but McGarrigan doesn’t think that next place is here.
“We don’t think it will truly come up in Ketchikan just because we are in such a small town,” said McGarrigan. “I can understand this kind of thing happening in big cities or areas, but not in a small town like Ketchikan.”
When and if the time comes, The Ketchikan Police Department will be ready.
“We can’t really do anything unless something happens, it’s like you can’t have a drug awareness program when drugs aren’t being abused in a certain area,” said McGarrigan. “It’s a reactionary thing and we will have to wait and see what happens next.”